++The Narrative Summary, Followed By the Full Narrative

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Bellows is flying solo in search of clear skies where it can find the resources to create a Next Generation National Service.

 

“Bellows” is the trade name of The Bellows Foundation, a 501(c)3 Non-Profit Arizona Corporation founded by Stephen B. Boyle in May of 2004.

The Bellows Mission:

We’re developing deep immersion learning environments that: (1) re-energize and transform America’s next generations to help them determine and advance their life-pursuits; (2) enable them to combine their high energy, fresh creativity, and drive to carry on the natural evolutionary advance of America and the American people; and (3) set the example for all the world’s populations to consider their own, unique plan for how to re-energize and transform their next generations.

Why Did Bellows Choose This Specific Mission?  Because of the Astounding Disintegration of Our Next Generation

The major causes of this disintegration are the ominous conditions listed below that surround America’s next generation.  For full details, go to top menu and click on “The Astounding Disintegration of Our Next Generation:

 

  1.       Millennials Are Considered the “Lost Generation” 
  2. ‘The Gig Economy’ Is The New Term For Serfdom
  3. Millennials projected to overtake Baby Boomers as America’s largest generation—Pew Research Center
  4. Record share of young women (and young men) are living with their parents, relatives—Pew Research Center
  5. Younger Americans Aren’t Moving Like They Used To: What’s Changed?                                
  6. The real reason so many millennials are living at home
  7. For First Time in Modern Era, Living With Parents Edges Out Other Living Arrangements for 18- to 34-Year-Olds
  8. More than half of millennials going through ‘quarter-life crisis,’ research finds
  9. Loan Shark Nation: Forcing Our Kids To Choose Between Student Loans And Everything Else
  10. Study Shows Student Debt Delays Home Buying By Seven Years
  11. Millennials Spend About $93,000 on Rent by The Time They Hit 30
  12. Millennials Delaying Entry into Adulthood
  13. The new face of suburbia: Economic woes and early death
  14. Social Media Use Associated With Depression Among U.S. Young Adults
  15. Millennials are starting to hate social media, too
  16. 34% of Generation Z Social Media Users Have Quit Social Media Entirely
  17. Marine Corps Commandant: Less Than 30% of Young Men and Women Qualified to Join Military
  18. Millennials: A Menacing Metamorphosis To The Status Quo
  19. A Quarter of Millennials Who Live at Home Don’t Work or Study
  20. Millennials At Work
  21. Are Millennials Financially Screwed?
  22. 50% Of Americans Live Payday-To-Payday; 33% Can’t Write A $500 Emergency Check
  23. All Ages Actual National Unemployment: January 2018—–21.8%
  24. All Ages Actual Annual Consumer Inflation: December 2016-2017 was 10.1%
  25. 94,708,000  Americans Not On The Labor Force–May, 2018
    78,554,000  Americans Not On The Labor Force–January, 2008    Equals  16,154,000—–20.5% More Americans Not On The Labor Force                                                                        
  26. 42,585,000 Americans Are Living At Or Below the Poverty Level—March 2017
  27. 46,312,243 Americans Are Food Stamp Recipients—-February 2018
  28. When 43% Of Americans Can’t Pay For Food And Rent, Economic Collapse Is Here
  29. The Deficit Is Beyond Control
  30. The Unpayable National Debt and Other Financial Statistics as of Early February 2018—$20.6 Trillion
  31. The Brookings Institution Is Forced To Concede The Deterioration of Our Next Generation
  32. Jamie Dimon Warns “Something Is Wrong” With The US
  33. “The Retail Bubble Has Now Burst”: A Record 8,640 Stores Are Closing In 2017
  34. US Restaurant Industry Suffers Worst Collapse Since 2009
  35. Why Americans Have Stopped Moving
  36. Now, we finally see the long-suppressed term coming to the surface:  “The Greater Depression,” instead of the fraudulent term, used since 2008, “The Great Recession.”
  37. The Real Cause Of The Opioid Epidemic: Scarcity Of Jobs And Positive Social Roles
  38. The Opioid Epidemic Is This Generation’s AIDS Crisis
  39. Depression rates rising fast for young U.S. teens
  40. Depression is on the rise in the US, especially among young teens
  41. Why Are More American Teenagers Than Ever Suffering From Severe Anxiety?
  42. Coping With Teenage Anxiety: Readers Share Their Stories    
  43. Feeling Isolated?  
  44. “Hopeless” European Millennials And The Populist Takeover
  45.  Millennials: The Standard and Misleading Mainstream Media Critique       
  46. In the U.S., the Drop in Life Expectancy More Concentrated Among People Under 65, Particularly in the 20s and 30s
  47. Suicide Among American Young Adults Aged 18-34; Racial and Gender Disparities; 2009-2013
  48. Next Generation Israeli Veterans Using “Subconscious Therapy” For Psychological Trauma
  49. The Real Reason Millennials Are Struggling
  50.        Loneliness Is Felt Most Intensely By Young People

For full details, go to top menu and click on “The Astounding Disintegration of Our Next Generation.

Our Next Generation is America’s greatest national resource because its traditional role is to provide the fresh infusions of new energy, enriching creativity, elemental drive, and the procreation function to propel the natural evolutionary advance of American society.  But America’s advance has already been interrupted, as describe below, while the media deceptively disguises this intentional blockage as the result of the “entitled, narcissistic, lazy, and unfocused” members of our Next Generation. In fact, their sense of disempowerment and disorientation is the “canary in the coal mine” indicator of a concealed, and so far successful, effort to interrupt the critically-needed fresh infusions by the cabal that we are all getting to know so well. We need a new National Service to re-energize and transform our beleaguered Next Generation and we need retired senior Marine NCOs to help develop individual psychological maturation in terms of strong work ethic, leadership, teamwork, and group solidarity. 

Implementation Of The Next Generation National Service Mission:  Components of the Deep Immersion Learning Environment

See the details of this new comprehensive learning environment at:

www.bellowsfoundation.wordpress.com

 

The Narrative Summary

of the Next Generation National Service

 

Components of the Next Generation National Service

1. Next Generation National Service (NGNS)—-Leadership and Headquarters:  The Bellows Foundation, directed by Stephen B. Boyle (see “About Us” in top menu), will undertake the formation and operation of a next generation national service, using the venerable structure of America’s Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) as an organizational model, but with a different mission and implementation.  The need for this national service is urgent and, therefore, we are seeking a private/public funding arrangement with the U.S. government.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt (above, at the head of the table) established the CCC with an executive order on April 5, 1933. The CCC was part of his New Deal legislation, combating high unemployment during the Great Depression by putting hundreds of thousands of young men to work on environmental conservation projects.  By July 1, 1933, 1,433 working camps had been established and more than 300,000 men put to work.  The CCC enrolled mostly young, unskilled and unemployed men between the ages of 18 and 25.  Enrollment in the CCC peaked in August 1935.  At the time, more than 500,000 corpsmen were spread across 2,900 camps. It’s estimated that nearly three million men—about five percent of the total United States male population—took part in the CCC over the course of the agency’s nine-year history. In 1942, Congress discontinued funding for the CCC, diverting desperately needed resources to the effort to win World War II (per the History Channel).

 

Leadership:  Formation and Operation of the Next Generation National Service

Founder’s Background

Steve Boyle lived and worked in the hotels that his father managed, passing from one department after another, gaining experience in the unique business environment of the hospitality industry.  He was raised in Hollywood, Florida and later in Highland Park, Illinois, where he graduated from Highland Park High School.  He acquired a BA degree with concentrations in Philosophy and Government from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York in 1962.

His father, Lawrence J. Boyle, had a distinguished career in the hotel industry, having been the general manager of hotels including the Ambassador East in Chicago; the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix; the Caribe Hilton in San Juan, Puerto Rico; the Area Director of the four Hilton Hotels in the Caribbean; and the Westgate Plaza in San Diego.  He served in World War II as a combat troop-carrier glider pilot in the European Theater.  Steve’s mother, Priscilla Jane Boyle, worked for the Navy on an aerial gunnery range in Opa-locka, Florida during the war.  Steve’s paternal grandfather, Lawrence Archibald Boyle, and grandmother, Nora Boyle, “came across on the boat” from Ireland in 1900 and settled in Milton, Massachusetts.  And Steve’s well-read maternal grandfather, Chester Henry Bellows, played a remarkably powerful mentoring role, along with grandmother Lillian Bellows, in the upbringing of their three children and six grandchildren.

After completing an MS of Accounting at the University of Massachusetts in 1968-69, Steve worked in real estate joint venture finance and development for six years as a Vice President and Treasurer of DLJ Properties Inc., an affiliate of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, Inc., a new, heavily research-oriented Wall Street investment firm.

He left DLJ to join EF Hutton & Company in 1975, where he was hired to start up and manage EF Hutton’s National Real Estate Investment Department.  One of the Department’s most successful development programs involved a series of seventeen (17) high quality apartment developments in joint venture with local developers in Altamonte Springs, Florida (an Orlando suburb); Jacksonville, Florida; Tulsa, Oklahoma; Phoenix, Arizona; Scottsdale, Arizona; Tucson, Arizona; and Colorado Springs, Colorado.  The high quality of these unique living environments was attributable to architect Dick Berry, a senior member of the Department, who played a critical role in the decision-making process pertaining to site locations, site planning, materials, interior layouts, and architecture that made all the difference in their strong market appeal.

In 1983, Steve and Dick left EF Hutton to co-found their own firm, Berry and Boyle, later renamed L’Auberge Communities LLC, the general partner and fiduciary of an additional seventeen (17) high quality apartment developments in joint venture with local developers in Phoenix, Tucson and Colorado Springs orchestrating development partnerships consisting of 7,000 investor/limited partners who contributed $40+ million of equity funding over and above mortgage financing.  In addition, the firm raised $7.8 million from 300 investors in a joint venture partnership to fund and oversee a 250-acre residential masterplanned land development on the lower slope of Cheyenne Mountain in Colorado Springs, Colorado.  The site is on the dark green slope in the top left background beyond the far housing.


 

 

In the 2000 to 2001 period, all the Berry and Boyle apartment properties were sold.  Between the apartment community developments we organized while at EF Hutton and the ones we organized through our own firm, we completed a total of  thirty-four (34) high quality apartment communities in joint venture with well-respected local developers, and together we received national recognition and several industry awards for the quality of our joint venture work.

Crossing Over To American Education

After all the apartment properties were sold, Steve crossed over to the field of education in 2001 to work on a Masters degree at Teachers College, Columbia University.  When he returned from Teachers College to Arizona in 2004, he formed the Bellows Foundation to be an instrument of innovation in new learning environments.

To become acquainted with the front lines of American education, he became a middle and high school teacher at Patagonia Union High School in Patagonia, Arizona in the 2008-2010 period.   He taught economics for high school seniors,  entrepreneurship as an elective, and general science for middle school students.  He also was a mentor to the hardest-case, at-risk students in the Patagonia school system.

From  2004 to the present, he has managed the Bellows Foundation and used its affiliate, the Bellows Institute, to undertake educational research and writing tasks beginning in late 2010.

Headquarters of The Bellows Foundation and it affiliate, Bellows Institute in Patagonia, Arizona:  2005-2010.

 

Seven+ Year Research and Writing Project

The global economic collapse that surfaced in 2008 was the catalyst of his decision in the Fall of 2010 to suspend his teaching responsibilities, move to Tucson, and spend full time on what turned out to be a seven+ year research and writing project to answer the research question:

“How does the world actually work as it relates to our Next Generation”

The writing culminated in two e-books, which are the cornerstone of the American National Service Study, which is registered with the U.S. Copyright Office.  The first e-book was completed on 10 Nov 2013 and was titled:  A Grandfather’s Encouragement To Our Next Generation.  The second e-book was completed on 8 Nov 2016 and was titled:  Restoring the Peace.  It went considerably further into the research question to examine possible solutions.

 

Earlier Work Responsibilities:

United States Marine Corps

In the summer of 1961, Steve had completed Marine Platoon Leaders Class (PLC) boot camp in Quantico, Virginia and in late 1962, after graduating from college, he received his commission in the Marine Corps as an officer and posted as a reconnaissance platoon leader to command 1st Platoon, Alpha Company, 2nd Reconnaissance Battalion, 2nd Marine Division, serving under battalion commander, Lt. Colonel Jack Westerman.  He served a three-year term of active duty (Dec. 1962 to Dec. 1965) that did not involve military service in Vietnam.

In the photo below, the platoon tasking called for the platoon leader (front, left) to position one four-man recon team, two radiomen and the vehicles with him in the infantry battalion headquarters to which his platoon was attached, and the platoon sergeant, (Staff Sergeant Tyrone, front, right) to position three recon teams and the corpsman with him at a concealed recon forward base to run patrols and gather intelligence in front of, and on the flanks of, the maneuvering infantry companies of the battalion.

A Marine Battalion Landing Team (BLT) is moved to its objective by a naval squadron consisting of up to 7 different categories of amphibious ships that deliver all the Marines and their equipment to the tactical area of responsibility (TAOR).  The Amphibious Assault Ship featured in the foreground of the image below provides all the air combat Marines and their equipment including Osprey V-22s, F-35s, AV-8B Harrier IIs, AH-1 SuperCobra attack helicopters, and heavy-lift CH-53 Sea Stallion helicopters.  Our reconnaissance platoon was frequently positioned aboard a shallow-draft Destroyer Escort (DE) in the squadron along with a Navy Underwater Demolition Team (UDT) in order: (1) to launch night landings in our rubber boats within range of the shore; and (2) position the Navy UDT in close to find and destroy steel obstacles protruding from the water near shore to block Marine landing craft from reaching the beach.

Below, Buckley-Class Destroyer Escort 107, USS Cronin:  1,740 tons, fully loaded; length–306 feet; beam–37 feet; draft–11.25 feet, fully loaded; speed–23 knots; range 3,700 nautical miles maintaining a speed of 23 knots.

Below, we used the LCSR–Landing Craft Swimmer Reconnaissance and then our rubber boats to get us from the Destroyer Escort to the shore, at night to avoid detection:  It is the draft of the Destroyer Escort (11.25 feet), and the draft of the LCSR (3 feet), and the minimal draft of the rubber boat that enables a reconnaissance team to get to shore safely in increasingly shallow waters.  Above, note where the LCSRs are stored mid-ship on the Destroyer Escort.

 

Below, practicing rubber boat landings from offshore Onslow Beach at Camp LeJeune, North Carolina.

Below, practicing a river pick-up using a rubber boat attached securely to the side of the LCSR.  In this case, our unit swam to the middle of the river, lined up approximately 300 feet apart, and the LCSR swept down the line to hook the raised arm of each Marine, one at a time, to heave them aboard.  The following link shows a pick-up in action:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMiR8qUZQgk

Below, scuba training for recon Marines is conducted at the U.S. Naval Base on Key West, Florida, which is an element of the Navy’s Underwater Demolition Team training for clearing beachheads of natural and enemy obstacles that have the potential of blocking assault waves of  landing craft carrying Marines from reaching the beach.  Scuba School is a 30-day course consisting of: (1) long conditioning runs to improve lung-power, and (2) long daylight conditioning swims in the ocean to further develop leg and arm power; (3) repeatedly being dropped 1,500 yards offshore at night and in daylight with scuba gear to swim ashore underwater on a compass bearing; (4) numerous diving with scuba gear to inspect the hulls of large Navy ships in the Naval Base Harbor; and (5) with scuba gear, making a 120-foot dive in deep water offshore, assembling and disassembling a complex set of pipe fittings, and (6) carefully ascending the 120-foot line up to the boat, with calibrated stops along the way.  During the descent, natural gases (mostly nitrogen) contained in our bodies as well as small amounts captured from the outside air while filling the scuba tanks, continue to dissolve into the tissue of the diver (i) as the water pressure increases with the depth of the dive, and (ii) with the accumulating duration of the dive.  If the ascent is too fast, the water pressure will decrease too quickly, and the dissolved gases (mostly nitrogen) will come out of solution and create bubbles that can damage just about any body area including joints, lung, heart, skin and brain. The diver must carefully follow a calibrated ascent (referred to as “decompression stops”) so that the dissolved gases in the diver’s tissues can come out of solution slowly enough to not create the deadly bubbles that can expand during the ascent and cause decompression sickness.

Earlier Work Experience:

Parachutes IncorporatedThe Start Up Organization That Brought Free-Fall Sport Parachuting From France To America

At the age of 19, Steve had the privilege of becoming a member of a start-up organization, Parachutes Incorporated, led by Jacques Andre Istel, Lewis Sanborn, and Nate Pond, that brought free-fall sport parachuting from France to America and constructed the first commercial free-fall parachuting school in the United States in Orange, Massachusetts, namely the Orange Sport Parachuting Center.  Steve worked his way up from bookkeeper to ground instructor to air instructor, and to first jump instructor in the 1959, 1960, and 1962 seasons.  The organization opened additional free-fall parachuting schools in Lakewood, New Jersey and Hemet, California. When Steve returned from military service, he  become the manager of the original  parachuting school in Orange, Massachusetts in the 1967 season.

The 1959  Opening Season of the First Commercial Free-Fall Parachuting School in the United States: The Orange Sport Parachuting Center

The Founders: Front Row ( l to r) Nate Pond, Lew Sanborn, Jacques Istel, and George Flynn

The Crew:         Second Row—–  Dusty Smith, Steve Boyle, and Bob Tripp

                             Third Row——–  Doug Craighead and Russ Wheeler 

 

The 1962 Season of the Orange Sport Parachuting Center, Hosting the World Parachuting Championships at Orange, Massachusetts

Below, the expansion of the Orange Sport Parachuting Center and our new Center in Lakewood, New Jersey called for the acquisition of an increasing number of nine-place Noorduyn Norseman aircraft. which were purchased from Wien Air Alaska.

Our first commercial free-fall parachuting center at Orange, MA was featured in Life Magazine in 1959 and 1960 and again in a runner-up Academy Award short subject film titled “A Sport Was Born” in 1960:

Click on this link to activate Part I of the film:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0i9AAq_6jAY

Click on this link for Part II:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1gd7E-pJJrk

 

 

The 1967 Season of the Orange Sport Parachuting Center

When Steve completed his three-year active duty tour in the Marine Corps, he returned to rejoin Parachutes Incorporated in Orange, Massachusetts, and became the Manager of the Orange Sport Parachuting Center in the 1967 Season.  Steve had worked his way up in the ranks from bookkeeper, ground crew, Ground Instructor, Air Instructor, and First Jump Instructor in the 1959, 1960, and 1962 Seasons.

 

Above, students for the next jump flight are chuting up with the assistance of the flight line crew.  In the background, you can see the quonset hut that houses the parachute riggers and rigging tables.  When the parachutes are repacked, they are positioned on shelves for easy access to the flight line.  To the left of the parachute packing quonset hut is the flight scheduling board, where the jump operation is centrally controlled.

Above, the next step before boarding the nine-place Noorduyn Norseman jump aircraft in the background is to line up for a final equipment check. To the right, Steve is standing at the flight scheduling board with the microphone to the PA system in hand.  The flight scheduling board is a raised platform several feet above the ground to give the Manager a better vantage point to see everything going on and to better control of the operation.

Above, the equipment check has been completed and the seven students are being guided to the aircraft by their jumpmaster and the pilot.

Here, Steve is overseeing the preparation for a high altitude jump from one of the school’s smaller Cessna aircraft.

 

Images From The 1959-1962 Seasons of the Jump Operation At The Orange Sport Parachuting Center in Orange, MA

 

The Long Free-Fall Jumps (up to 12,500 feet) Were Made From A Three-Passenger Cessna Aircraft

 

Steve, above, and Dusty Smith (below) were jump partners demonstrating free-fall maneuvers in the short subject film, “A Sport Is Born,” the  runner-up in the 1960 Academy Awards for Short Subject Films, which can be seen in the embedded videos above.

The Orange Sport Parachuting Center Benefitted From a Large Sand Drop Zone At The Center of the Airfield

 

Untitled: The Image Says It All

 

Instructor Nate Pond (right) and Student Parachutists In Training

The Norseman jump aircraft can carry 9 students

Instructor Terry Terrioux (left) Doing Some Debriefing Of His Students

 

Instructor Dusty Smith (left), Enjoying The Exuberance Of His Students

 

 

 

1930s Barnstormer, Batch Pond, Is the Chief Jump Pilot At The Orange Sport Parachuting Center

 

Research and Development Work For The Marine Corps and Army Special Forces

Parachutes Incorporated, (PI), the parent company of the Orange Sport Parachuting Center, was well connected to the United States Marine Corps through its research and development activities that involved teaching the Marine Corps to use high-altitude, low opening, free-fall parachuting techniques for entry to carry out clandestine reconnaissance missions on the ground.  In the image, below, Jacques Andre Istel, the founder of PI, is exiting a Douglas F3D Skyknight using the bottom ejection system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jacques Andre Istel, Founder of Parachutes Incorporated and its affiliates: the Orange Sport Parachuting Center (MA), Lakewood Sport Parachuting Center (NJ), and the Hemet Sport Parachuting Center (CA).  Jacques brought the free-fall parachuting techniques from France to the United States in 1958.  After he graduated from Princeton, he joined the United States Marines Corps as an infantry officer and served in Korea.  He currently holds the rank of Lt. Colonel in the Marine Corps Reserves.  For more details of his background, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques-André_Istel

 

Avocation

Steve’s avocation has always been aviation; for twenty-three years he flew an open-cockpit Great Lakes biplane out of Norwood, MA, Colorado Springs, Lake Norman, N.C., Scottsdale, AZ and Tucson, AZ.  His longest flight was from Colorado Springs to Lake Norman/Charlotte, N.C.:  1,340 miles in four days at 105 MPH cruise speed, 17 fuel stops, and just one close call, namely, being out-run on short final to a fuel stop by a large, very dark, ugly, lightning-streaked and fast-moving storm front that overtook us from the west.

 

 

The Initial Conceptualization of the Next Generation National Service

The origins of the Next Generation National Service concept began to take shape around this heavy mesquite seminar table during the economics class for all the seniors of the Patagonia Union High School in the school year of 2008-2009.

There was a great deal of experimentation:

The Principal of Patagonia Union High School, Peter Fagergren (Ed.D.) urged me to interlace my teaching of economics with personal stories whenever possible about my real world experiences in: (i) helping form the new sport of free-fall parachuting; (ii) the military culture of the Marine Corps as a reconnaissance platoon leader; (iii) working successively in two large for-profit corporations; (iv) co-founding and operating my own investment firm for over 25 years; (v) co-founding and operating a 501(c)3 educational foundation; (vi) the merits of working on two masters degrees; (vii) the requirements and experience of being a father and grandfather; (viii) taking personal risk while learning to apply “margin of error” to stay intact; (ix) reaching for a state of personal equanimity; and (x) navigating through life, which seemed to be marked by increasing corruption, criminality, and  the  unfortunate disintegration of moral and ethical standards in many American institutions.

The seniors in the photo, above, thoroughly enjoyed their classroom environment of student engagement and trust in one another.  Moreover, they enjoyed the out-of-doors experiences I invented to keep them alert, including the free-fall simulator at the SkyDive Arizona parachuting center.  Bellows, our educational foundation, continues to be dedicated to the success of America’s next generations to show up and enter the fray to add their high energy, their fresh creativity, and their high spirituality to power America’s natural evolutionary advance.

By the way, the economics course was not dry and overly academic.  Instead, the entire 2008-2009 time span was filled with the most shocking and puzzling real world events leading to the largest global economic collapse, which resulted in Ben Bernanke, the Chairman of the Federal Reserve disbursing $16.3 trillion of tax-payer money and credit from 2008 to 2010 to American banks, foreign banks, foreign central banks, transnational corporations, and certain individuals at a time when the U.S. national debt was already $14 trillion.  What was that all about?  It caused a great deal of critical thinking around that mesquite seminar table.  We might even say that it began to re-energize and transform all of us around that table——a form of awakening.

Some First Hand Experience in Mentoring As Well As Orchestrating Narcotics Rehabilitation

From my mentoring experience, I believe it’s no wonder that some of our sons and daughters are showing signs of wear and tear from the mounting social and economic conditions that surround us all. We know the signs: anxiety, resistance, withdrawal, apathy, unhappiness, lack of focus, lack of self-esteem, excessive sleeping, irresponsibility, hostility, and for some, increasing opioid use.

My greatest mentoring challenge occurred while attending Columbia University’s Teachers College, where I was the mentor, guardian and financial benefactor to a 26-year-old heroin-addicted mother and her 6-year-old daughter for a two-year period.  After bringing them under my roof, to her great credit, the mother detoxed in three months at a Catholic detox center in Rhinebeck, NY and then enrolled in a 13-week course I had arranged at a top theater make-up school in Lower Manhattan, where she was hired by the same school as an instructor upon graduation.   We had few issues over that two-year period, and the mother went on to become a key member of the team that supports the on-the-road Broadway shows that tour the U.S., and her daughter, now in her 20s, is doing well.

I became further immersed in these personal wear and tear situations as a high school and middle school teacher in a small town along the U.S./Mexico border.   I taught economics to the seniors, general science from 6th through 9th grades, and I offered an entrepreneurship course as an elective.  I was also a mentor to the hardest-case, at-risk students in the school, where my assistance included, (i) moving one student, with the help of a county judge, from impending incarceration to a counseling group; and (ii) extricating another student—-with a quiet warning from the town marshal—-from probable arrest just as a multi-agency narcotics bust swept through town to apprehend 21 persons of interest. The path was cleared for both students to graduate and move on to employment.  These conspicuous successes solidified my working relationship with my other at-risk students because they trusted that I was 100% on their side.

Moreover, I found that mentoring and teaching entrepreneurship go hand-in-hand because our next generation is yearning to compare notes and swap ideas about how to proceed with their plans for the future. And they yearn to do this with older, well-experienced, and trusted individuals——resembling a caring uncle or aunt, or a devoted grandfather or grandmother——the authentic figures in their lives who are good listeners and storytellers of the real world; those who will provide their insights from long and diverse personal experience——and, in doing so, help each student develop his or her own internal compass.

The other mentoring duties I’ve experienced have come from more traditional responsibilities:  (i) fathering two children who are now in their 50s, (ii) leading a reconnaissance platoon of 28 next generation Marines, (iii) managing a next generation staff of the free-fall parachuting school at Orange, MA, (iv) starting up and operating our own twenty-five year-old investment and real estate management firm that grew to 100 next generation staff members, as well as (v) carrying on as a father of two children and a grandfather of four grandchildren.

One additional skill acquired was organizing and leading many trips for groups of my customers and their teenage children that entailed considerable physical outdoor activities, including: (1) trekking on foot on the Kalalau Trail on the island of Kauai on twelve occasions; (2) trekking on a portion of the Milford Track in New Zealand; and (3) making a six-day trek on horseback on the legendary Outlaw Trail in Utah each year for six years.

Orchestrating An Encounter Between An Old Breed of Mentors Who Are the Elders of Our Current American Society and Our Next American Generation

This encounter would call for assembling, training, and deploying a force of American elders who have the age, the life-experience, and the insights our next generations need to cope with the difficult economic, social, and psychological conditions they face. Such elders would be the men and women who have already connected the dots; who know how the world actually works and who have tremendous desire to draw in our youth and young adults to give them the grounding needed to advance with a sense of solidarity and with their inner compasses revitalized.

The elders would sharpening the critical thinking of their students by broadening their perspectives and organizing them into “thought communities” in which the impediments to trust are eliminated and openness, creativity and challenging existing paradigms would be routine. One such example is to reexamine the premises of education along the following lines: Institutions of education of any society, in the best cases, hold and project the internal compass of those societies; becoming the repository of the ideals, the core beliefs that provide vital direction, and the sense of solidarity to sustain themselves under the most adverse conditions.

The internal compass of any society is a reflection of the dominant educational system in place.  That compass is shaped by a “great narrative” of the society it guides. Neil Postman, in his The End Of Education (1996), provides an excellent insight into the importance of a great narrative as a fundamental necessity of any society, community, or group.  All such narratives, according to Postman:

“…….tell of origins and envision a future, a story that constructs ideals, prescribes rules of conduct, provides a source of authority, and, above all, gives a sense of continuity and purpose…..one that has sufficient credibility, complexity, and symbolic power to enable one to organize one’s life around it…….one that provides people with a sense of personal identity, a sense of a community life…..Our genius lies in our capacity to make meaning through the creation of narratives that give point to our labors, exalt our history, elucidate the present, and give direction to our future.”

Could it be that this old breed of mentors—elders of our American society—are the right ones to re-illuminate the great American narrative for the benefit of our next generation, and the next generations to follow?  If such illumination is unlikely to come from the parents, or from traditional schooling, or from tutoring, or from therapy, who are more ideal than the elders—–the ones of long experience and insights who already know that great American narrative and have internalized it long ago—–to pass that folklore on to our next generations?

Finally, we wouldn’t be able to fully complete this Narrative section of the website without answering the following question:

Who Is Bellows?

The work of The Bellows Foundation is dedicated to the memory of Chester Henry Bellows, Steve’s maternal grandfather. Born in New York City in 1890, his dedication to learning and mentorship profoundly affected his children, grandchildren, and many others who were inspired by his personal attention, depth of knowledge, and his insights.  Chet’s academic aspirations were thwarted by The Great Depression. He devoted much of his spare time to humanitarian and educational efforts including the Boy Scouts and the Methodist Episcopal Church. Were he alive today, one would hear his mirthful chuckle to think that his influence might have an impact on American education in the troubled times of the early 21st century.

Steve, making a $10,000 contribution from Bellows to the Chairman of the Board of San Miguel High School in south Tucson to support practicum education in the form of internships to San Miguel students who all are benefitting from spending every Friday from 8 AM to 5 PM of the entire four years of schooling as interns employed by local business and non-profit organizations.

 

Headquarters of the  Next Generation National Service (NGNS):  Tucson, Arizona

The headquarters of the Bellows-operated Next Generation National Service is intended to be in the Mercado District of Tucson, Arizona, between Congress Street and Cushing Street on the western side of the Santa Cruz River and Interstate 10 that is marked with a blue X in the lower left of the map, below.

This tract has a close proximity to the Mercado San Agustin Public Market (restaurants, shops and farmers market), the El Rio Health Center, “A” Mountain and its 272-acre Sentinel Peak hiking/biking park, the Tucson Streetcar system that passes through Downtown Tucson, the 4th Avenue Business District, and connects with the University of Arizona, 2.5 miles away.  (More details and photography can be found in the Full Narrative that follows this Narrative Summary.)

 

2—Next Generation Mentor Learning:  Western culture has removed its elders from the education of its next generations.  What was eliminated was the crucial impact of long experience, the crucial insights, the wisdom, and the deep instincts to shape a sustainable and better world.  Bellows will restore the use of older, wiser, and well-seasoned mentors to rebuild the inner compass of our next generations.

 

 

 

 

3—Next Generation Creative Collaboration Learning Environments:  The transformation of classroom space to draw students together to form a “thought community” where the impediments to trust among students are eliminated, teamwork takes over, and the possibility of breakthroughs in critical thinking can transcend existing paradigms and advance knowledge.

The Traditional American Classroom Makes an Immediate Statement of Potential Student Non-Engagement

 

Instead, a Learning Environment of Creative Collaboration

Steve and his students sat together around this mesquite seminar table for the entire course.  The course began in August of 2008, just as the global economic collapse surfaced in public light.  Student engagement was high throughout the course as one economic shock after another was discussed and dots connected around the seminar table.  It was an awakening experience for all hands.

4—Next Generation Scope of Learning:  Harmonization of Interdisciplinary Academic Study and Practicum Experience

(This section is under construction)

The scope of learning is being accumulated and sifted through, i.e., personal relationships, parenting, trustworthy American and world history; the Declaration of Independence; the U.S. Constitution; the American Revolution; American principles; the American great narrative and great narratives of other nations; governmental dynamics; economics and finance; geopolitics; analytic philosophy (for example (https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/wittgenstein/); selected biographies; STEM; corporate cultures and dynamics, including groupthink, and OODA Loop applications; entrepreneurship and start-up dynamics; creative writing with Strunk and Latin prep to refine one’s use of English in writing and speaking; global and local organized crime; comparative religion as it pertains to moral and ethical behavior; psychology, psychiatry and mass psychosis; propaganda, psychological warfare and mass mind-control; reaching higher social intelligence and social consciousness; situational awareness; planning for and speaking to groups; leadership and followership in hierarchical environments; negotiations and debating;  mental, physical, and coordination conditioning; agriculture; food consumption; pharmaceuticals; and systematic eradication of threats to the sustainability of humankind and nature.

We attended an October 2004 gathering at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington that was insightful and compelling because thirteen students from four colleges tackled the following question: “What Elements Might Be Missing from American Education?”

All afternoon, these students laid out their thoughts and provided the elements that they believed were missing, which have been included within the Scope of Learning component:

  • Field studies that connect with students’ academic concentrations to deepen meaning and to make classroom-acquired knowledge relevant to the real world of the 21st century.
  • Reconnecting with the natural world and indigenous cultures in order to internalize the urgency for safeguarding a sustainable future and have an undisturbed time to carry on the vital process of self-reflection to consider one’s personal worldview and one’s identity in this context.
  • Discovering and expanding one’s unique creative spirit and range of creative expression.
  • Broadening one’s perspective about real world interactivity, maintaining a sense of responsibility to others, and participating in the achievement of a just society.
  • Considering a variety of realistic life-pursuits that can make a difference in the world by immersion in real world work environments and by interfacing with older men and women who bring intuitive understanding and good judgment from long experience in their life-pursuits.
  • Developing a frame of mind and coping ability that allows one to address the realities of life with equanimity and good judgment, rather than succumbing to uncertainty, anxiety and depression.

A partial Bibliography of academic resources is provided in Component #4 of the Full Narrative below and will be the source from which readings will be selected and lesson plans will be drawn for the Bellows Mentors to utilize.

5—Next Generation Prospective Field Centers:

Next Generation Prospective Field Centers:  Six Prospective Immersions 

Reconnecting to the deep values of our natural and historic surroundings that will include:

  • Tucson, Arizona Headquarters, and Patagonia, Arizona and its mountain desert environs, fifteen miles from the U.S./Mexico border.
  • Petersburg, Alaska, with its  nearby Le Conte glacier and Frederick Sound, where 1,000 humpback whales converge each summer.
  • The Ecuadorian Rainforest With The Achuar People, a 4,000 year-old tribal subset of the legendary Jivaro people who, over centuries, had to fight off the Inca Empire, the Spanish Conquistidors, and now the international oil companies to prevent their extinction.
  • The Surreal North Coast of the Island of Kaua’i: A Deep Immersion in the Natural World
  • The U.S. East Coast Corridor through Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, DC, the Shenandoah Valley National Park, Yorktown, Virginia, and near Charlottesville, Virginia.

Our preferred way of getting to the Bellows domestic field centers is by customized bus with sleeping berths similar to the highly-respected Green Tortoise operation, which we may charter when feasible.  For details, pull up:  https://greentortoise.com/adventure.travel.html

You will find details and photography of the six prospective Bellows field immersions in the Full Narrative that follows this Narrative Summary.

 

6—Entering the Fray As the Ultimate Learning Environment:  We mean always being on stand-by status to drop everything, pack up fast, and head toward the fray, whatever it may be.  This is the opportunity to step out of the training mode and jump into a developing situation anywhere in America or abroad, where the need for a strong presence, firm support, and outside volunteer help is welcomed and urgently called for.

(i)  In late August 2005, when Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf area, Bellows quickly moved its 14-passenger van from Patagonia, Arizona to  Baton Rouge, Louisiana (1,329 miles) where it was engaged to transport evacuees.

Below, a walk-through of one Red Cross Shelter in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

 

Above and below, we transported the Delgrado family from the Baton Rouge Red Cross Shelter to reunite with their friends, who were located in the Houston area.

 

Below, a walk-through of the Houston Astrodome Red Cross Shelter.

Above, a walk-through the Houston Astrodome Red Cross Shelter

Above, the Houston Astrodome filling with evacuees from Hurricane Katrina in August 2005.  A total of 29,000 evacuees filled all three Houston Red Cross Shelters.

Below, a walk-through of the Red Cross Shelter in San Antonio, Texas, on the way back to Patagonia, Arizona.

 

(ii)  And in March of 2012, Steve and a group of other like-minded individuals visited the Achuar people in the Ecuadorian Rainforest to lend support as they faced transnational oil companies that threatened the invasion and destruction of their land, their public health, and their very existence.  The gathering was part of a continuous campaign orchestrated by the Pachamama Alliance (www.pachamama.org) to create a wide-spread American presence and support for the Achuar to build counter-pressure through global public relations to slow down and hold back the transnational oil companies and the un-constitutional Ecuadorian government.  The Achuar and other indigenous peoples in Ecuador and Peru have greatly suffered from geopolitical dynamics resulting in underfunded governments in South America attempting to illegally sell oil  tract concessions within indigenous territories as a means to attract debt financing from countries such as China, that is making substantial investments in South American countries.

More details and photography can be found in the Prospective Ecuadorian Rainforest Field Center located in the Full Narrative that follows this Summary Narrative.

 

7.  Next Generation Mental, Physical, and Coordination Conditioning and Re-energizing

The Conditioning Mentors will have the responsibility to:

  • Pull their students out of their comfort zones and build their mental and physical strength to peak performance.
  • Teach their students how to maintain that level of mental and physical strength throughout their lives.
  • Teach their students coordination by having them learn different forms of dance and of martial arts.
  • Teach their students how to select, apportion, prepare, cook their own meals by serving shifts in the student kitchens to learn food intake discipline.
  • Teach their students to embrace a high level of  situational awareness—un-intiminated by the realities of life—guided by flexible planning, strength of character, sound judgment, and deeply-rooted equanimity, rather than succumbing to uncertainty, anxiety and depression.
  • For the physical and mental safety of the students, there will be monitoring and longitudinal study of key vital signs to measure changes in physical and mental condition.  Furthermore, detection of the use of narcotics, alcohol, and other mind-altering substances by the National Service inductees will result in automatic transfer to a central detox and psychological center and re-enrollment in a later inductee cohort upon successful completion of proscribed treatment.

 

The Morning Run

 

A Part Of The “O” Course

 

 

The First Level Of Creative Collaboration

 

The Basics of Operating As A Team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learning About Situational Awareness

 

 

Learning About Personal Fortitude

 

Learning To Enter and Adapt To Other Environments

 

 

Learning About Trust And Handling Stress

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Entering Another World At The Buffalo Chip Saloon In Cave Creek, Arizona

 

Embracing Hatha Yoga

 

Jujutsu

 

Kickboxing

 

 

Beginning To Re-Energize and Transform

 

8—Next Generation Workplace Training Simulators:

(i) Full-Scale Workplace Training Simulators—designed as a prototypical workspace consisting of three integrated sub-spaces: (i) the six-person work space, (ii) their conference space, and (iii) the supervisor’s office, where a faculty member can play the supervisor role in order to learn leadership and followership dynamics, and where leadership and team interaction is practiced by giving each student a chance to take on the supervisor’s role.  The Simulator operation will have a working relationship with local corporate operations to perfect the accurate scripting of the work scenarios of the Simulator.  Additional details and photography can be found in the Full Narrative that follows this Narrative Summary.

(ii) Mobile Workplace Training Simulators—The use of large custom vehicles to get student teams of up to ten on the road and visit a series of profit or non-profit operations of any kind to develop a comprehensive comparative analysis of the economic niche being studied that is both a student learning experience in close collaboration with peers, but may also be of value to the respective operations which could provide another valuable level of collaborative exchange (between the student teams and each operational staff).  For example, the student team of ten can join in a combined workspace on the Internet with the operational staff and run a work scenario together in which a scripted role-play can be carried on to achieve a specific operational objective and an after-action critique can also be carried out.  Then to stimulate the vital camaraderie, they can all meet at a local watering hole for dinner to swap stories.

 

 

9—Next Generation Boarding House Communities:  The present dire condition of the American economy has created a disastrous situation for our next generation.   These 18 to 34 year-olds are under- or unemployed, in the grip of debt dependency due to monumental college debt, and as a result, 36% of them have now been forced to live in their parental home to make ends meet.  Accordingly, there is an emergency need for housing that fits their situation.  That solution is the boarding house community, which consists of an apartment-style design, with unit sizes ranging from 255 to 437 square foot one-bedroom units and a one-bedroom unit with a sleeping alcove for up to two children at 461 square feet.  The boarding house design follows the old-style boarding house of the 1800s and 1900s in that it offers a common areas including a group dining facility, a laundry service, a living room, a quiet room, wide porches on all sides, and, in our design, a day care center, and a job placement service.

Next Generation Boarding House Community

(More details and photography of the Boarding House Community can be found in the Full Narrative that follows this Narrative Summary.)

 

10.  Next Generation Individual/Team Job Placement:  An integral component of the Next Generation National Service (NGNS) is periodic visits to employers for the following purposes:

  • Ask key management members to explain what is missing from the education of its new employees.
  • Explain the value of setting up one or more on-site workplace training simulators to help the employer improve the proficiency of its workforce.
  • Volunteer to build the first workforce training simulator for the employer and getting it into operation.  A special team from NGNS will be sent to undertake this task.  Follow up with new scenarios and theater-play features that widen the effectiveness of the workplace training simulator.
  • Explain the value of engaging NGNS’s special camps to prepare and re-energize certain members, teams, and departments of the employer’s workforce with input from the employer to customize the learning environments and methodologies.

Publish reports to all employers about NGNS’s accumulating improvements made to its learning environments and methodologies and their results.

Illuminate specific NGSG students and their qualifications for placement and escort each student to the first interview (and others where feasible) to insure a smooth transition to successful placement.

NGNS will endeavor to place its students in teams of two to six with each employer by: (1) helping the employer recognized such work niches; (2) determining the detailed needs of that niche; (3) volunteering to modify a NGNS workplace training simulator with scenarios and theater-play to further train the student team to meet the specific needs of that niche before sending the team to arrive for employment.

 

11.  The Pilot Project:  Next Generation National Service Working With Tucson’s Next Generation:  The start-up phase will be to begin development of the NGNS Pilot Project with Tucson’s Next Generation.  As this effort gathers momentum, several other U.S. counties with populations under 1 million will be selected to begin their NGNS Pilot Projects.  Accordingly, the Next Generation National Service will spread at the county level across the U.S. and thus much of the management will emanate from the county level, with the administrative hub initially being located in Tucson, Arizona, within Pima County.

(End of the Narrative Summary)

The Full Narrative

Implementation Of The Next Generation National Service Mission:  Components of the Deep Immersion Learning Environment

 

See the details of this new comprehensive learning environment at: www.bellowsfoundation.wordpress.com

1. Leadership and Headquarters of the Next Generation National Service (NGNS)

The Bellows Foundation, directed by its founder, Stephen B. Boyle, will undertake the formation and operation of a next generation national service, using the venerable structure of America’s Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) as an organizational model, but with a different mission and implementation.  The need for this national service is urgent and, therefore, we will seek a private/public funding arrangement with the U.S. government.

The location of the Next Generation National Service is intended to be in new Mercado District of Tucson, Arizona, between Congress Street and Cushing Street on the western side of the Santa Cruz River and Interstate 10 that is marked in red in the lower left of the map immediately below.  This tract has  a close proximity to the Mercado San Agustin Public Market (restaurants, shops and farmers market), the El Rio Health Center, “A” Mountain and its 272-acre Sentinel Peak hiking/biking park, the Tucson Streetcar system that passes through Downtown Tucson, the 4th Avenue Business District, and connects with the University of Arizona, 2.5 miles away.


   

Near the base of  267-foot “A” Mountain and its 272-acre park, and biking/hiking trails.  “A” Mountain got its name from the large letter “A” that University of Arizona students shaped with painted stones, which you can see at the very top.

Below, a long biking and hiking trail along the adjacent Santa Cruz River.

 

The 36th Street and Wild Burro Trailheads Lead Into A Excellent Network of Hiking Trails In The Tucson Mountain Range, Just 6.5 Miles From the National Service Locale Near Mercado San Agustin

 

 

Using the modern streetcar system map as a guide, the National Service locale is marked below by the “X” next to the word “Mercado,” drawn in the lower left of the map.  It is served by a modern streetcar system that passes from “X” mark, through Downtown Tucson and the 4th Avenue Business District and connects with the University of Arizona, 2.5 miles away.

Downtown Tucson is also a five-minute walk from the  “X” mark, along Congress St.

The “X” marked area is very close to the Mercado San Agustin Public Market, which provides a concentration of shops, restaurants, a bakery, a bike shop, and a weekly farmers market.

Below, you can see the Farmers Market in operation along the front of the Mercado San Agustin.

Below, is the main entrance of the Mercado San Agustin.

 

The entrance opens up into a large courtyard acting as the centerpiece of restaurants, specialty foods and beverages, bakery, retail stores, including a bike shop.  The farmers market is positioned facing the front street.

 

More restaurants and watering holes are spread out along the entire Streetcar system up to the University of Arizona campus.

Below, Transit Cycles, the bike shop.

 

Below, the Streetcar coming across the Santa Cruz River from the Mercado District area into Downtown Tucson.

 

 

There is an excellent medical service facility adjacent to the BellowsMentors locale:  Below, El Rio Health Center, a two-minute walk away, provides 95,000 people with affordable health services including adult medicine, family medicine dental, pharmacy, pediatrics, OB/GYN, physical therapy, midwifery, behavioral health, specialized care, exercise and wellness.

Access to other facilities:

1.3 miles to Safeway Supermarket and Food City

1.3 miles to St. Mary’s Hospital (a well-respected major hospital)

0.7 miles to Pima Community College.

A short walk to the Joel Valdez Main Library in Downtown Tucson.

2.5 miles to University of Arizona.

1.7 miles to the Greyhound station.

1.4 miles to the train station:  Tucson is an Amtrak train depot in Tucson, Arizona, served three times a week by the Sunset Limited and Texas Eagle trains.

8.4 miles to Tucson International Airport.

109 miles to Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport, with reliable shuttle service.

What Are The Planners Hoping To Achieve With The Mercado District?

(This article was written in early 2014)

 

 

 

 

 

Leadership:  (see Leadership section in the Narrative Summary, above, or in the “About Us” in the menu above)

2. Next Generation Mentor Learning

The obstacles many of our next generation face are not able to be addressed by parental upbringing, formal schooling, tutoring and therapy. Do we conclude that Americans are out of ideas about addressing the full education needed by our next generations under these unprecedented times?  Does history have anything to offer?

Thankfully, there is long historical evidence that the resilience and solidarity of many indigenous societies rested on a strong educational force of elders who, because of their advanced age, long experience, and insights, held the respectful attention of their youth and young adults and prepared them—in terms of resilience and moral character, as well as competency——to face and address changing social and economic conditions of great difficulty.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(See details in the top menu line titled:  “Next Generation Mentor Learning.”

3—Next Generation Creative Collaboration Learning Environment:

The Insightful Research of Dr. Vera John-Steiner on Critical Thinking and Collaboration Dovetails With The Collaborative Learning Environment Depicted, Below

One path to the development of a “great narrative” is through the development of “thought communities” that make creative exploration possible, which is presented by  Dr. Vera John-Steiner in her book, Creative Collaboration (2000); a study of successful collaboration of notable partners and groups, some in face-to-face interaction and others in distance interaction. The result of her examination is that:

“…humans come into being and mature in relation to others, new skills are acquired, participants develop previously unknown aspects of themselves,  and they increase their repertory of cognitive and emotional expression.  This requires “fully articulated and shared goals, a safe place for creative exploration, and unimpeded trust.”

(Professor Vera John Steiner (1930-2017)

And it thereby eliminates “uncertainty, competition, hierarchies, bureaucracies, intellectual ownership, financial dependence, inequity, separation and emotional disconnectedness.”

With these “relational dynamics” in place,

“thought communities collaborate with an intensity that can lead to a change in their domain’s dominant paradigm…..pressing each participant’s perceived limits of human potential.”

In other words, she suggests that the atmospherics that eliminate impediments to trust can: (i) empower participants to transcend and reshape dominant paradigms that pose obstacles to creative exploration and, (ii)  bring to the surface new perspectives and  a great narrative that can be shared throughout American society.

Ready for a Paradigm Shift:  The Traditional American Classroom:  Seating arranged in regimental order, all facing forward, students able to remain disconnected from their peers and their teacher by pretending to be engaged, an authoritarian atmosphere, a potential low level of student engagement, not conducive to critical thinking and little ability to achieve creative collaboration and paradigm shifts for the better.

Below, Steve’s classroom was achieved a collaborative learning environment For all grade levels from seniors down to middle school students who thoroughly enjoyed the change and were drawn into creative collaboration.

It is interesting to note that on the first day of class, at least five teachers and a several administrators came to see the classroom arrangement and stood in silence, letting it sink in.  The comments from the teachers were expressed concern:

“Good luck, but I couldn’t do this.  I have a lot of material to cover and it requires strict control to get it all in.”

(This comment might have to do with standardized testing that overloaded lesson plans, which, in turn, resulted in pressure on teachers to “teach to the test.”)

“I don’t like this informality.  I want to stand and I wouldn’t want to let them sit this close to me.”

(A concept some academics refer to as “professional distance.”)

“This wouldn’t work for me because it’s too casual.  I have to stand with my student chart on the podium and call on them to keep them alert and engaged.”

(What do you think this means?  Don’t all three of these teachers’ responses reflect control issues, suggesting student resistance to engagement?)

It was interesting how little adjustments  helped bring the collaborative spirit to the surface: (i) two of the students were intimidated by sitting at the table, so they took the higher chairs against the far wall; (ii) Aaron wanted to wear his blue cap so he didn’t feel intimidated; (iii)Kaitlin (far right student) wanted to sit next to her boyfriend, which led to whispering, but only minimal, (iv) they all had eye contact with each other, which meant they couldn’t fake engagement, (v) I sat with them at their same level, at all times, and (vi) we would stand up and walk outside to get some fresh air before we resumed.

And I had one advantage—-I was sixty-eight years-old and I interjected my observations of the world I had experienced, the good and not-so-good dynamics that they might expect in the real world, and gave them both amusing and serious suggestions for how to maintain their equanimity and advance the ball in their future work environments.  For example, one tip I inserted at an appropriate time they had never heard before:  I explained how to “create awe” when appropriate and also how to “react to awe” being projected against them by manipulative superiors, peers and subordinates.  And, from time to time, when I droned on too long on dry subject matter, a hand would go up and someone would ask:  “Mr. Boyle, could we have another good war story about the fray, as you call it?” Accordingly, there were few control or engagement issues.

Another Setting For a Collaborative Learning Environment:  Out of the Classroom and Under Open Skies

We attended an October 2004 gathering at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington that was insightful and compelling because thirteen students from four colleges tackled the following question: “What Elements Might Be Missing from American Education?”

All afternoon, these students laid out their thoughts and provided the elements that they believed were missing, as follows:

1. Field studies that connect with students’ academic concentrations to deepen meaning and to make classroom-acquired knowledge relevant to the real world of the 21st century.

2. Reconnecting with the natural world and indigenous cultures in order to internalize the urgency for safeguarding a sustainable future and have an undisturbed time to carry on the vital process of self-reflection to consider one’s personal worldview and one’s identity in this context.

3. Discovering and expanding one’s unique creative spirit and range of creative expression.

4. Broadening one’s perspective about real world interactivity, maintaining a sense of responsibility to others, and participating in the achievement of a just society.

5. Considering a variety of realistic life-pursuits that can make a difference in the world by immersion in real world work environments and by interfacing with older men and women who bring intuitive understanding and good judgment from long experience in their life-pursuits.

6. Developing a frame of mind and coping ability that allows one to address the realities of life with equanimity and good judgment, rather than succumbing to uncertainty, anxiety and depression.

Following that very impressive presentation, we decided to organize a January 2005 Colloquium at the Circle Z Ranch in Patagonia and invite those students to repeat the presentation before a larger group of students, faculty, and administrators. The participants in the Colloquium numbered forty-three students, faculty and administrators from thirteen colleges and universities, including Alverno College, Daemen College, Deep Springs College, Evergreen State College, Hampshire College, New College of Florida, Fairhaven College, Ursuline College, Pitzer College, University of Arizona, Columbia University, Texas Christian University, and University of Wisconsin.  Deans Mike Ford and Steven Weisler of Hampshire College, and Dean Alan Jones of Pitzer College were in attendance.

We were privileged to have with us Jack Newell, the former President of unique Deep Springs College; Celtic priest, Dara Molloy, who heads a learning community in the Aran Islands of Ireland; and Josiah Bunting III, President of The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation in New York and author of An Education For Our Time.   We were also graced by the presence of two Patagonia residents, Dr. Meredith Aronson, the former mayor of Patagonia, and Carol Soth, a well-regarded educator who specializes in the storytelling tradition of learning.

Absent, but with us in spirit, were Dr. Lee Knefelkamp, faculty member of Teachers College, Columbia University (Steve’s dissertation advisor) and Dr. Gregory Prince, former president of Hampshire College, Amherst, MA.

4—Next Generation Scope of Learning:  The Harmonization of  Interdisciplinary  Study and Practicum Experience 

(This section is under construction)

The scope of learning are being accumulated and sifted through, i.e., parenting, trustworthy American and world history; the Declaration of Independence; the U.S. Constitution; the American Revolution; American principles; the American great narrative and great narratives of other nations; governmental dynamics; economics and finance; geopolitics; selected biographies; STEM; corporate cultures and dynamics, including Groupthink, and OODA Loop applications; entrepreneurship and start-up dynamics; creative writing with Strunk and Latin prep to refine one’s use of English in writing and speaking; global and local organized crime; comparative religion as it pertains to moral and ethical behavior; analytic philosophy (https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/wittgenstein/); psychology, psychiatry and mass psychosis; propaganda, psychological warfare and mass mind-control; reaching higher social intelligence and social consciousness; situational awareness; speaking to teams and to larger groups; leadership and followership in hierarchical environments; negotiations and debating;  mental, physical, and coordination conditioning; agriculture; food consumption; pharmaceuticals; and systematic eradication of threats to sustainability of humankind and nature.

We attended an October 2004 gathering at Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington that was insightful and compelling because thirteen students from four colleges tackled the following question: “What Elements Might Be Missing from American Education?”

All afternoon, these students laid out their thoughts and provided the elements that they believed were missing, which have been included within the Scope of Learning component:

  • Field studies that connect with students’ academic concentrations to deepen meaning and to make classroom-acquired knowledge relevant to the real world of the 21st century.
  • Reconnecting with the natural world and indigenous cultures in order to internalize the urgency for safeguarding a sustainable future and have an undisturbed time to carry on the vital process of self-reflection to consider one’s personal worldview and one’s identity in this context.
  • Discovering and expanding one’s unique creative spirit and range of creative expression.
  • Broadening one’s perspective about real world interactivity, maintaining a sense of responsibility to others, and participating in the achievement of a just society.
  • Considering a variety of realistic life-pursuits that can make a difference in the world by immersion in real world work environments and by interfacing with older men and women who bring intuitive understanding and good judgment from long experience in their life-pursuits.
  • Developing a frame of mind and coping ability that allows one to address the realities of life with equanimity and good judgment, rather than succumbing to uncertainty, anxiety and depression.

A partial Bibliography of academic resources will be the source from which readings will be selected and lesson plans will be drawn for the Bellows Mentors to utilize.

Partial Bibliography of Interdisciplinary Study For Reading and Lesson Plan Preparation

 

Anderson, G. (2008)  Cityboy: Beer and Loathing in the Square Mile. London: Headline Publishing.
Anton, V. Kenneth (2012)  Popsicle Man:  Solving the Puzzle of a 200 Year Conspiracy.  Raptor Press
Arad, R., Arad, U., McCulloch, R., Pinera, Hollick, A., Editors (1979) Sharing Global Resources. 1980s Project of the Council of Foreign Relations.  New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company
Auerbach, R.D. (2008) Deception and Abuse At the Fed: Henry B. Gonzalez Battles Alan Greenspan’s Bank. Austin: University of Texas Press.
Bagdikian, B.H. (2004)  The New Media Monopoly: A Completely Revised and Updated Edition With Seven New Chapters. Boston: Beacon Press.
Barnes, P. (2006)  Capitalism 3.0: A Guide To Reclaiming The Commons. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

Blumenfeld, S. & Newman, A.(2014) Crimes of the Educators: How Utopians Are Using Government Schools to Destroy America’s Children. WND Books, Washington DC

Brands, H.W. (2000)  The First American: The Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin. New York: Doubleday.
Briody, D. (2005)  The Iron Triangle: Inside the Secret World of the Carlyle Group. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons.
Brown, E.H. (2008)  Web of Debt: The Shocking Truth About Our Money System and How We Can Break Free. (3rd ed.). Baton Rouge: Third Millenium Press.
Brzezinski, Z. (1997)  The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and its Geostrategic Imperatives. New York: Basic Books.
Brzezinski, Z. (2012) Strategic Vision. New York: Basic Books
Bunch, W. (2010)  Backlash: Right-Wing Radicals, High Def Hucksters, and Paranoid Politics in the Age of Obama. New York: HarperCollins.
Butler, S.D. (2003)  War Is A Racket. Port Townsend, WA: Feral House.
Carpenter, D.S. & Feloni, J. (1989)  The Fall of the House of Hutton. New York: Harper & Row.

Carr, W.G.  (2014)  Pawns in the Game–FBI Edition. San Diego: 2323 Broadway 92102: Dauphin Publications

Chambers, R. (1997)  Whose Reality Counts?: Putting the First Last. London: ITDG Publishing.
Chang, H. (Ed.)(2001)  The Rebel Within: Joseph Stiglitz and the World Bank. London: Anthem Press.
Chernow, R. (1993)  The Warburgs: The 20th Century Odyssey of a Remarkable Jewish Family. New York: Random House.
Coleman, J. (2009)  The Federal Reserve. Las Vegas: World Int. Review.
Coleman, J. (1992)  Conspirators’ Hierarchy: The Story of the Committee of 300. Carson City, NV: American West Publishers.
Coleman, J. (1999)  What You Should Know About the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Las Vegas: World Int. Review.
Coleman, J. (2005)  Tavistock Institute of Human Relations: Shaping the Moral, Spiritual, Cultural, Political, and Economic Decline of the United States of America. Las Vegas: World Intelligence Review.

Coleman, J. (2009)  Freemasonry From A To Z.   Las Vegas:World Intelligence Review.

Coleman, J. (2009)  Beyond the Conspiracy: Unmasking the Invisible World Government, The Committee of 300.  Las Vegas: World Int. Review.
Coleman, J. (2009)  Drug War Against America. Las Vegas: World Int. Review.

Coleman, J  (2009)  Obama’s America.  Las Vegas, World Int. Review

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Corsi, J.R.  (2018)  Killing the Deep State: The Fight to Save President Trump.  Humanix Books, Boca Raton, Florida

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de Soto, H. (1989)  The Other Path: The Economic Answer To Terrorism. New York: Basic Books.
de Soto, H. (2000) The Mystery of Capital: Why Capitalism Triumphs in the West and Fails Everywhere Else. New York: Basic Books.
Diamond, J. (2006)  Collapse: How Societies Choose To Fail Or Succeed. New York, Penguin Group.
Dobbs, L. (2006)  War on the Middle Class: How the Government, Big Business, and Special Interest Groups Are Waging War on the American Dream and How To Fight Back. New York: Penguin Group.
Ehrenreich, B. (2001)  Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America. New York: Henry Holt.
Ehrenreich, B. (2005)  Bait and Switch: The (Futile) Pursuit of the American Dream. New York: Henry Holt.
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Executive Intelligence Review (Ed.) (1991) Dope Inc.: The Book That Drove Henry Kissinger Crazy. Washington: Executive Intelligence Review.
Executive Intelligence Review (Ed.) (2010) Dope, Inc.: Britain’s Opium War Against the World. Joshua Tree, CA: Progressive Press.
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Freire, P. (1968)  Pedagogy of the Oppressed  Continuum

Ferguson, N. (1999)  The House of Rothschild: The World’s Banker, 1849-1999. New York: Penguin Group.
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Freeland, E. (2014)  Chemtrails, HAARP, and the Full Spectrum Dominance of Planet EarthFeral House, Port Townsend, WA

Freeland, E. (2018) UNDER AN IONIZED SKY: From Chemtrails to Space Fence Lockdown.  Feral House, Port Townsend, WA

Fukuyama, F. (1995)  Trust: The Social Virtues and the Creation of Prosperity. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Gatto, J.T. (2017) The Underground History of American Education, Volume I:  An Intimate Investigation Into the Prison of Modern Schooling. Valor Academy

Gatto, J.T. (2010) Weapons of Mass Instruction: A Schoolteacher’s Journey Through the Dark World of Compulsory Schooling. New Society Publishers

Gatto, J.T. (2001) The Underground History of American Education: A School Teacher’s Intimate Investigation Into the  Problem of Modern Schooling.  Oxford Village Press

Gatto J.T. (2002) Dumbing Us Down: the Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling, 2nd Revised Edition.  New Society Publishers

Gatto J.T. (2002) The Exhausted School: Bending the Bars of Traditional Education. Berkeley Hills Books.

Gatto J.T. (2001) A Different Kind of Teacher: Solving the Crisis of American Schooling Berkeley Hills Books.

George, A.L. & George J.L. (1964)  Woodrow Wilson and Colonel House: A Personality Study. New York: Dover.
Gibbon, E. (1960)  The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. New York: Harcourt, Brace.
Gladwell, Malcolm (2002) The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference.  Boston: Back Bay Books.

Golden, D. ((2017)  Spy Schools: How the CIA, FBI, and Foreign Intelligence Secretly Exploit America’s Universities. New York: Henry Holt and Co.

Goleman, D. (2006)  Social Intelligence: Beyond IQ, Beyond Emotional Intelligence: The Revolutionary New Science of Human Relationships. New York: Bantam Dell.
Greco, Jr., T.H. (2009)  The End of Money and the Future of Civilization. White River Junction, VT: Chelsea Green.
Greider, W. (1987)  Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country. New York: Simon & Schuster.
Greider, W. (2003)  The Soul of Capitalism: Opening Paths to a Moral Economy. New York: Simon & Schuster.
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Griffin, G.E. (2002) The Creature from Jekyll Island: A Second Look at the Federal Reserve. (4th ed.) Westlake Village, CA:  American Media.
Hacker, J.S. (2006)  The Great Risk Shift: The Assault on American Jobs, Families, Health Care, and Retirement and How You Can Fight Back. New York: Oxford University Press.
Halberstam, D. (2001)  The Best and the Brightest. New York: Random House.
Halstead, T. (Ed.). (2004)  The Real State of the Union: From the Best Minds of America, Bold Solutions to the Problems Politicians Dare Not Address. New York: New America Books.
Hartmann, T. (2002)  Unequal Protection: The Rise of Corporate Dominance and the Theft of Human Rights. Rodale. Harlan, IA

Hartwell, D.T., (2012) Planes Without Passengers: the Faked Hijacking of 9/11 Second Edition.  CreateSpace Independent Publishing: an Amazon Company.

Hawken, P. (2007)  Blessed Unrest: How the Largest Social Movement in History Is Restoring Grace, Justice, and Beauty to the World. New York: Penguin Group.
Hawken, P., Lovins, A. & Lovins, L.H. (1999)  Natural Capitalism: Creating the Next Industrial Revolution. Boston: Back Bay Books.
Heidenheimer, A.J. & Johnson, M. (Ed.). (2002) Political Corruption: Concepts & Contexts. (3rd ed.) New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers.
Henderson, D. (2010) Big Oil & Their Bankers in the Persian Gulf: Four Horsemen, Eight Families & Their Global Intelligence, Narcotics & Terror Networks. (3rd ed.) Bridger House Publishing (on-line).
Hertsgaard, M. (2002)  The Eagle’s Shadow: Why America Fascinates and Infuriates the World. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.
Hiatt, S. (2007)  A Game As Old As Empire: The Secret Work of Economic Hit Men and the Web of Global Corruption. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.
Hirsch, Jr., E.D. (2009)  The Making of Americans: Democracy and Our Schools. New Haven: Yale University Press.
Hirsch, F., Doyle, M.W., Morse, E.L. (1979) Study: Alternatives To Monetary Disorder, 1980s Project/Council of Foreign Relations.  New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.
Hodgson, G. (2006)  Woodrow Wilson’s Right Hand: The Life of Colonel Edward M. House. New Haven: Yale University Press.
Homer-Dixon, T. (2006)  The Upside of Down: Catastrophe, Creativity, and the Renewal of Civilization. Washington: Island Press.
House, E.M. (1912)  Philip Dru: Administrator: A Story of Tomorrow 1920-1935. Kessinger Publishing.
Hudson, W.E. (1998)  American Democracy in Peril: Seven Challenges to America’s Future. Chatham, NJ: Chatham House.
Icke, D. (2010)  Human Race Get Off Your Knees: The Lion Sleeps No More. Isle of Wight: David Icke Books
Iserbyt, C.T. (1999)  the deliberate dumbing down of america. Ravenna, OH: Conscience Press:
James, H. (2001)  The End of Globalization: Lessons From the Great Depression. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Jeffrey, G.R. (2009)  Shadow Government: How the Secret Global Elite Is Using Surveillance Against You. Colorado Springs: WaterBrook Press.
Johnson, D.C. (2003)  Perfectly Legal: The Covert Campaign To Rig Our Tax System To Benefit The Super Rich—and Cheat Everybody Else. New York: Penguin Group.
Johnson, S. & Kwak, J. (2010)  13 Bankers: The Wall Street Takeover and the Next Financial Meltdown. New York: Pantheon Books.
Jones, A. (1996)  How the World Really Works. Paradise, CA: ABJ Press.
Jones, V. (2008)  The Green Collar Economy: How One Solution Can Fix Our Two Biggest Problems. New York: HarperCollins.
Kaplan, H.H. (2006)  Nathan Mayer Rothschild and the Creation of a Dynasty: The Critical Years, 1806-1816. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
Karger, H. (2005)  Short Changed: Life and Debt in the Fringe Economy. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.
Kay, L.E. (1993)  The Molecular Vision of Life: Caltech, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Rise of the New Biology. New York: Oxford Press.
Kegan, R. (1994)  In Over Our Heads: The Mental Demands of Modern Life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Ketcham, R. (Ed.) (2003)  The Anti-Federalist Papers: and the Constitutional Convention Debates: The Clashes and the Compromises That Gave Birth To Our Form of Government. New York: New American Library.
Kienholz, M. (2008)  Opium Traders and Their Worlds, Volume One. Bloomington, IN: iUniverse.
Kienholz, M. (2008)  Opium Traders and Their Worlds, Volume Two. Bloomington, IN: iUniverse.
Klein, N. (2002)  Fences and Windows: Dispatches From the Front Lines of the Globalization Debate. New York: Picador.
Klein, N. (2007)  The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. New York: Picador
Knuth, E.C. (2006)  The Empire of “The City”: The Secret History of British Financial Power. San Diego: The Book Tree.
Lernoux, P. (1984)  In Banks We Trust: Bankers and Their Close Associates: the CIA, the Mafia, Drug Traders, Dictators, Politicians, and the Vatican.  Garden City, NY: Anchor Press/Doubleday

Lev, A. (2015)  The Truth: A Pathway To The Subconscious

Lewis, M. (2010)  The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine.  New York:  W.W. Norton.
Liaquat, A. (2009)  Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World. New York: Penguin Press.
Machiavelli, N. (1952)  The Prince. New York: Mentor Classics.
Mahl, T.E. (1998)  Desperate Deception: British Covert Operations in the United States, 1939-44. Dulles, VA: Brassey’s.
Mandela, N. (1995)  Long Walk To Freedom: The Autobiography of Nelson Mandela. Boston:Back Bay Books.
McCarty, N., Poole, K.T. & Rosenthal, H. (2006)  Polarized America: The Dance of Ideology and Unequal Riches. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.
McIlany, II, W.H. (1980)  The Tax-Exempt Foundations. Westport, CT: Arlington House.
Mokhiber, R. & Weissman, R. (2005)  On The Rampage: Corporate Predators and the Destruction of Democracy. Monroe, ME: Common Courage Press.
Morgan, D.T. (1996)  The Devious Dr. Franklin, Colonial Agent: Benjamin Franklin’s Years in London. Macon, GA: Mercer University Press.
Morgenson, G. & Rosner, J. (2011)  Reckless Endangerment: How Outsized Ambition, Greed, and Corruption Led To Economic Armageddon. New York: Henry Holt.
Morton, F. (1991)  The Rothschilds: A Family Portrait. New York: Collier Books.

Mullins, Eustace (1993) The Secrets of the Federal Reserve  Staunton, VA: Bankers Research Inst.

North, P. (2010)  Local Money: How To Make It Happen In Your Community. Devon: Transition Books.
Paine, T. (1776)  Common Sense. Philadelphia:  William and Thomas Bradford (Mineola, NY: Dover).
Perkins, J. (1994)  The World Is As You Dream It:  Shamanic Teachings From the Amazon and Andes. Rochester, Vt: Destiny Books.
Perkins, J. (2004)  Confessions of An Economic Hit Man. New York: Penguin Group.

Perkins, J. (2016)  New Confessions of an Economic Hit Man.  Oakland: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

Perkins, J. (2007)  The Secret History of the American Empire: Economic Hit Men, Jackals, and the Truth About Global Corruption. New York: Penguin Group.
Perloff, J. (1988)  The Shadows of Power: The Council on Foreign Relations and the American Decline. Appleton, WI: Western Islands.
Phillips, K. (2002)  Wealth and Democracy: The Political History of the American Rich. New York: Broadway Books
Phillips, K. (2004)  American Dynasty: Aristocracy, Fortune, and the Politics of Deceit in the House of Bush. New York: Penguin Group.
Phillips, K. (2008)  Bad Money: Reckless Finance, Failed Politics, and the Global Crisis of American Capitalism. New York: Penguin Group.
Prouty, L.F. (2011)  The Secret Team: The CIA and its Allies in Control of the United States and the World.   New York: Skyhorse Publishing.
Putnam, R.D. (2000)  Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community. New York: Simon & Schuster.
Quigley, C. (1966)  Tragedy & Hope: A History of the World in Our Time. San Pedro, CA: GSG & Associates.
Quigley, C. (1979)  The Evolution of Civilizations: An Introduction to Historical Analysis. (2nd ed.). Indianapolis: Liberty Fund.
Quigley, C. (1981)  The Anglo-American Establishment: From Rhodes to Cliveden. San Pedro, CA: GSG & Associates.
Ray, P.H. & Anderson, S.R. The Cultural Creatives: How 50 Million People Are Changing the World. New York: Harmony Books.
Robinson, J. (1996)  The Laundrymen: Inside Money Laundering, the World’s Third Largest Business. New York: Arcade Publishing.
Robinson, J. (2000)  The Merger: The Conglomeration of International Organized Crime. New York: The Overlook Press.
Robison, J. (2011)  Proofs of a Conspiracy Against All the Religions and Governments of Europe. Lexington, KY: Zuubooks.
Rossiter, C. (Ed.). (1961)  The Federalist Papers. New York: New American Library.
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Roy, A. (1999)  The Cost of Living. New York: The Modern Library.
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Roy, A. (2003)  War Talk. Cambridge, MA: South End Press.
Roy, A. (2004)  An Ordinary Person’s Guide To Empire. Cambridge, MA: South End Press.
Rubin, R.E. & Weisberg, J. (2003)  In An Uncertain World: Tough Choices From Wall Street to Washington. New York: Random House.

Salla, M. (2018) Antarctica’s Hidden History: Corporate Foundations of Secret Space Programs. Hawaii: Exopolitics Institute, Pahoa

Sargant, W., (1997) Battle for the Mind: A Physiology of Conversion and Brainwashing.  Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday.
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Schlesinger, Jr., A.M. (1959)  The Coming of the New Deal: The Age of Roosevelt. Boston: Houghton Mufflin.
Schlesinger, Jr., A.M. (1960)  The Politics of Upheaval: The Age of Roosevelt. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
Schlesinger, Jr., A.M. (1973)  The Imperial Presidency. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
Schlesinger, Jr., A.M. (1998)  The Disuniting of America: Reflections on a Multicultural Society. New York: W.W. Norton.
Shafer, P.W. & Snow, J.H. (1962)  The Turning of the Tides. New Canaan, CT: The Long House.
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Sirota, D. (2006)  Hostile Takeover: How Big Money & Corruption Conquered Our Government—And How We Take It Back. New York: Crown Publishers.
Sirota, D. (2008)  The Uprising: An Unauthorized Tour of the Populist Revolt Scaring Wall Street and Washington. New York: Crown Publishers.
Smith, A.D.H. (1918)  The Real Colonel House. New York: George H. Doran Company
Smith, Y. (2010)  Econned: How Unenlightened Self-Interest Undermined Democracy and Corrupted Capitalism. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
Sorkin, A.R. (2010)  Too Big To Fail: Inside the Battle to Save Wall Street. New York: Penguin Books.
Sterngold, J. (1990)  Burning Down the House: How Greed, Deceit, and Bitter Revenge Destroyed E.F. Hutton. New York: Summit Books.
Stiglitz, J.E. (2002)  Globalization and Its Discontents. New York: W.W. Norton.
Stiglitz, J.E. (2003)  The Roaring Nineties: A New History of the World’s Most Prosperous Decade. New York: W.W. Norton.
Stiglitz, J.E. (2007)  Making Globalization Work. New York: W.W. Norton.
Stiglitz, J.E. (2010)  Freefall: America, Free Markets, and the Sinking of the World Economy. New York: W.W. Norton.
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Sutton, A.C. (1981)  Wall Street and the Bolshevik Revolution. Morley, Western Australia: Veritas Publishing.
Sutton, A.C. (1983)  An Introduction To The Order. Phoenix: Research Publications.
Sutton, A.C. (1983) How the Order Controls Education. Phoenix: Research Publications.
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Sutton, A.C. (2002)  Wall Street and the Rise of Hitler. San Pedro, CA: GSG & Associates.
Tarpley, W.G. (2006)  9/11 Synthetic Terror: Made In USA. (3rd ed.). Joshua Tree, CA: Progressive Press.
Tarpley, W.G. (2008)  Obama: The Postmodern Coup. Joshua Tree, CA: Progressive Press.
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Tuchman, B.W. (1984)  The March of Folly: From Troy to Vietnam. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

Unger, M.J. (2008)  Magnifico: The Brilliant Life and Violent Times of Lorenzo de’ Medici.  New York: Simon & Schuster

Unger, M.J.  (2011)  Machiavelli: A Biography.  New York: Simon & Schuster

Walbert M.W. (1899)  The Coming Battle; A Complete History of the National Banking Money Power in the United States. Chicago: W.B. Conkey Co.
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Wedel, J.R. (2009)  Shadow Elite: How the World’s New Power Brokers Undermine Democracy, Government, and the Free Market. New York: Basic Books.
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Wells, H.G. (1934)  Experiment In Autobiography, Volume II. London: Faber and Faber.
Wesley, Rawles, J. (2009)  How To Survive the End of the World As We Know It: Tactics, Techniques, and Technologies for Uncertain Times. New York: Plume.
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Whitaker, R.W.  (2004)  Why Johnny Can’t Think–America’s Professor–Priesthood.  Kudzu Media, N. Augusta, S.C.

Whitney, J.O. (1994)  The Trust Factor: Liberating Profits & Restoring Corporate Vitality. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Williams, P.L.  (2017)  Among the Ruins: The Decline and Fall of the Roman Catholic Church.  Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books

Wills, G. (1982)  The Kennedy Imprisonment: A Meditation on Power. Boston: Back Bay Books.
Wilson, D. (1988)  Rothschild: The Wealth and Power of a Dynasty. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons.
Winograd, M. & Hais, M.D. (2011)  Millennial Momentum: How a New Generation is Remaking America. Piscataway, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

Wittgenstein Section:

Hacker, P.M.S. (1996) Wittgenstein’s Place in Twentieth Century Analytic Philosophy

Earnshaw, O. (2010)  Wittgenstein and Analytic Philosophy: Essays for P.M.S Hacker

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophyhttps://plato.stanford.edu/entries/wittgenstein/  c/o Metaphysics Research Lab, Cordura Hall/Room 202, Stanford University,   210 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305-4115

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/critical-theory/   c/o Metaphysics Research Lab, Cordura Hall/Room 202, Stanford University,   210 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305-4115

Brill S.B.  (1994)  Wittgenstein & Critical Theory: Beyond Postmodern Criticism and Toward Descriptive Investigations

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophyhttps://plato.stanford.edu/entries/postmodernism/  c/o Metaphysics Research Lab, Cordura Hall/Room 202, Stanford University,   210 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305-4115

Staten, H.  (1986) Wittgenstein and Derrida

Matar, A. & Mattison, L.  (2018)  Understanding Wittgenstein, Understanding Modernism

Wittgenstein, L. & G.E.M. Anscombe  (1991)  Remarks on the Philosophy of Psychology, Vol. #1

Harre, R. & Tissaw, M.  (2005)  Wittgenstein and Psychology: A Practical Guide

Schulte, J.  (1995)  Experience and Expression: Wittgenstein’s Philosophy of Psychology

Bouveresse, J. & Descomb, V.  (2013)  Wittgenstein Reads Freud: The Myth of the Unconscious

Greve, S.S. & Macha, J.  (2015)  Wittgenstein and the Creativity of Language

Wittgenstein, L. & Rhees, R.  (1978)  Philosophical Grammer

Kripke, S.A.  (1982)  Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language: An Elementary Exposition

Wittgenstein L. & G.E.M Anscombe  (1973)  Philosophical Investigations, Third Edition

McGinn, M.  (1997)  Routledge Philosophy Guidebook To Wittgenstein and the Philosophical Investigations

McNally, T.  (2017)  Wittgenstein and the Philosophy of Language: The Legacy of the Philosophical Investigations

Genova, J.  (2016)  Wittgenstein: A Way of Seeing

Badiou, A.  (2011)  Wittgenstein’s Anti-Philosophy

Hacker, P.M.S.  (2002)  Wittgenstein: Connections and Controversies

Wittgenstein L. & Russell, B., (2016)  Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus–The Original Authoritative Edition

White, R.  (2006)  Wittgenstein’s Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus: A Readers Guide

Monk, R.  (1991)  Ludwig Wittgenstein: The Duty of Genius

Monk, R. & Critchley, S.  (2005) How to Read Wittgenstein

Waugh, A.  (2009)  The House of Wittgenstein: A Family At War

Janik, A. & Toulmin, S.E.  (1996)  Wittgenstein’s Vienna

Janik, A.  (2018)  Wittgenstein’s Vienna Revisited

McGuinness, B.  (2005)  Young Ludwig: Wittgenstein’s Life, 1889-1921

McGuinness, B. & Winslow, P.  (2018)  Wittgenstein’s Family Letters: Corresponding With Ludwig

Wittgenstein, L.  (1993)  The Terry Engleton Script and Derik Jarman Film

Malcolm, N. & von Wright, G.H.  (1965)  Ludwig Wittgenstein: A Memoir

Wolf, W. (2007)  The End of America: Letter of Warning To a Young Patriot: A Citizen’s Call To Action. Chelsea Green Publishing Co., White River Junction, VT
Wormser, R. (1958)  Foundations: Their Power and Influence. San Pedro, CA: GSG & Associates
Yates, M.D. (2003)  Naming the System: Inequality and Work in the Global Economy. New York: Monthly Review Press.
TITLES FROM THE BIBLIOGRAPHY THAT PERTAIN TO EDUCATION

Blumenfeld, S. & Newman, A.(2014) Crimes of the Educators: How Utopians Are Using Government Schools to Destroy America’s Children. WND Books, Washington DC

Gatto, J.T. (2017) The Underground History of American Education, Volume I:  An Intimate Investigation Into the Prison of Modern Schooling. Valor Academy

Gatto, J.T. (2010) Weapons of Mass Instruction: A Schoolteacher’s Journey Through the Dark World of Compulsory Schooling. New Society Publishers

Gatto, J.T. (2001) The Underground History of American Education: A School Teacher’s Intimate Investigation Into the  Problem of Modern Schooling.  Oxford Village Press

Gatto J.T. (2002) Dumbing Us Down: the Hidden Curriculum of Compulsory Schooling, 2nd Revised Edition.  New Society Publishers

Gatto J.T. (2002) The Exhausted School: Bending the Bars of Traditional Education. Berkeley Hills Books.

Gatto J.T. (2001) A Different Kind of Teacher: Solving the Crisis of American Schooling Berkeley Hills Books.

Goleman, D. (2006)  Social Intelligence: Beyond IQ, Beyond Emotional Intelligence: The Revolutionary New Science of Human Relationships. New York: Bantam Dell.

Hirsch, Jr., E.D. (2009)  The Making of Americans: Democracy and Our Schools. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Iserbyt, C.T. (1999)  the deliberate dumbing down of america. Ravenna, OH: Conscience Press:

Kegan, R. (1994)  In Over Our Heads: The Mental Demands of Modern Life. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

McIlany, II, W.H. (1980)  The Tax-Exempt Foundations. Westport, CT: Arlington House.

Ray, P.H. & Anderson, S.R. The Cultural Creatives: How 50 Million People Are Changing the World. New York: Harmony Books.

Sargant, W., (1997) Battle for the Mind: A Physiology of Conversion and Brainwashing.  Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday.

Shafer, P.W. & Snow, J.H. (1962)  The Turning of the Tides. New Canaan, CT: The Long House.

Sutton, A.C. (1983) How the Order Controls Education. Phoenix: Research Publications.

Whitaker, R.W.  (2004)  Why Johnny Can’t Think–America’s Professor–Priesthood.  Kudzu Media, N. Augusta, S.C.

Winograd, M. & Hais, M.D. (2011)  Millennial Momentum: How a New Generation is Remaking America.

Wormser, R. (1958)  Foundations: Their Power and Influence. San Pedro, CA: GSG & Associates

 

5.  Next Generation Prospective Field Centers:  Six Prospective Immersions 

Reconnecting to the deep values of our natural and historic surroundings that will include:

  • Tucson, Arizona Headquarters, and Patagonia, Arizona and its mountain desert environs, fifteen miles from the U.S./Mexico border.
  • Petersburg, Alaska, with its  nearby Le Conte glacier and Frederick Sound, where 1,000 humpback whales converge each summer.
  • The Ecuadorian Rainforest With The Achuar People, a 4,000 year-old tribal subset of the legendary Jivaro people who, over centuries, had to fight off the Inca Empire, the Spanish Conquistidors, and now the international oil companies to prevent their extinction.
  • The Surreal North Coast of the Island of Kaua’i: A Deep Immersion in the Natural World
  • The U.S. East Coast Corridor through Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, DC, the Shenandoah Valley National Park, Yorktown, Virginia, and near Charlottesville, Virginia.

 

Our preferred way of getting to the domestic Field Centers is by customized buses with sleeping berths similar to the well-respected Green Tortoise operation, which we may charter when feasible.  For details, pull up:  https://greentortoise.com/adventure.travel.html

 

Pilot Project Course Outline

(find full Course Outline in above menu titled: “Outline of the Pilot Project of The Next Generation National Service.”) 

The First Class: 48 male volunteers among the highest at-risk 18-34 year-old veterans, divided into twelve, four-member teams, with a buddy system of two members each, and 12 Bellows Mentors, one for every four veterans.

Course Term: 18-month term starting February 1st, 2019, in Tucson, Arizona, with our volunteer veterans arriving from points of departure across the U.S.

Breakdown of 18-Month Course:  Six prospective locations for three months each: (1) in Tucson, Arizona; (2) in Petersburg, Alaska; (3) in Boulder, Utah; (4) in Kaua’i, Hawaii; (5) in the Achuar Territory of the Ecuador Rainforest; and (6) within the U.S. East Coast Corridor, including Lexington, Massachusetts and Concord Bridge, then Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, DC, Shenandoah National Park, Yorktown, Virginia, and ending close by Charlottesville, Virginia; with a visit, along the way, to the Six Nations Iroquois Reserve 50 miles west of Niagara Falls, New York:

Sequence of 18-Month Classes That Follow the First Class:  One Class of 48 members will arrive in Tucson every three months, each for its eighteen-month Course term.  At the end of the first 18-month term and thereafter, there will be 288 members and 72 mentors flowing through the mobile Deep Immersion Learning Environment at all times with 48 members and their 12 mentors centered at each of the six field locations.  To expand the volume of veterans in the mobile Deep Immersion Learning Environment, new locations and new routes will be added as required.

Orientation and Personal Equipment Issue: Distribution of  pre-positioned and pre-size-determined durable western clothing, waterproof dusters, durable cowboy hats (see apparel, right), and riding boots, trekking boots, watch hats, ball caps, gloves, socks, underwear, knee/elbow pads, belts, notepads, pens, binoculars, goggles, towels, toiletry kits and other field equipment including collapsible field chairs, two-man tents, sleeping bags, navigation gear, field tools, mess gear, backpacks, canteens, climbing/rappelling helmets, and heavy rain gear for Petersburg, Kaua’i, and the Ecuadorian Rainforest.           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each Class of 48 veterans will be transported in 2 Green Turtle-style buses and its 12 mentors will be transported in three 30-foot Cruise America recreational vehicles. For details of Green Turtle buses:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8YidiXGgQM.  For details of Cruise America RV:  https://www.cruiseamerica.com/rent/

1. Tucson, Arizona Field Headquarters: Practicum Training and Interdisciplinary Academic Study–Three Months(for details and images: https://wp.me/P9fWT5-Cw)

White Stallion Ranch in Marana, Arizona for short horse treks as well as climbing and rappelling training to get conditioned for longer horse treks and more intensive climbing and rappelling practice at other field centers during the term; country western dance training at the Buffalo Chip Saloon in Cave Creek, Arizona; free-fall parachute training at SkyDive Arizona Center in Eloy, Arizona; workplace training simulator practice; psychological maturation development; entrepreneurship training; physical, mental, and psychological conditioning including obstacle course, Hatha yoga and martial arts; interdisciplinary academic study for critical thinking; horse treks near the Patagonia-Sonoita Creek Preserve, a world-class Nature Conservancy bird sanctuary; borderland familiarization with multi-generational Mexican/American families in Patagonia, Arizona as well as American ranchers with cattle operations on the U.S./Mexico border; border crossing at Nogales, Arizona and familiarization by U.S. Border Patrol members; Native American culture immersion with members of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe and the Tohono O’odham Nation; development of American Great Narrative; creative collaboration; and community volunteer work.

2. Petersburg, Alaska Field Center Within the Inside Passage: Practicum Training and Interdisciplinary Academic Study–Three Months (for details and images: https://wp.me/P9fWT5-1q)

Exploration of the Frederick Sound, Le Conte Glacier, and Le Conte Bay natural habitat which is part of the largest temperate rainforest in the United States that sustains an extraordinary variety of flora, sea life and wildlife to include: migrating whales (greys, humpbacks, minke, belugas and orcas); sea otters, white-sided dolphins, sea lions, seals, porpoises and salmon; 240 species of birds including bald eagles, owls, and trumpeter swans; black and brown bear, black-tailed deer, moose, beaver, mountain goats, wolves, minks, and voles. For details of the temperate rainforest, see: https://www.onlyinyourstate.com/alaska/tongass-national-forest-ak/; physical, mental, and psychological conditioning, including obstacle course, Hatha yoga and martial arts; kayaking to the Le Conte Glacier; bay and river fishing; long treks on foot in the Stikine-LeConte Wilderness of the Tongass National Forest; approaching 9,000-foot Devil’s Thumb for climbing and rappelling with boat passage from Petersburg, up the Stikine river to Telegraph Creek, and a long trek on foot west over the Stikine Ice Cap, passing Kate’s Needle along the way; mix with hosts of the indigenous Tlingit people of the Pacific Northwest Coast whose origins date back as early as 11,000 years ago (see https://www.warpaths2peacepipes.com/indian-tribes/tlingit-tribe.htm); development of American Great Narrative; interdisciplinary academic study for critical thinking with focus on Wittgenstein, Nietzsche, Lacan, Pascal, Rousseau, Kierkegaard, Jung, Derrida, Sartre, Montaigne, and Jordan Peterson; study of First Principles; creative collaboration; psychological maturation development; workforce training simulator practice; entrepreneurial training development; and community volunteer work.

3. Boulder, Utah Field Center Within the Four Corners Region: Practicum Training and Interdisciplinary Academic Study–Three Months (for details and images: https://wp.me/P9fWT5-1o)

Long horse treks including the legendary Outlaw Trail to Robbers Roost and entering Canyonlands National Park to observe the spectacular rock art of the Anasazi people; treks on foot, as well as climbing and rappelling in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument area and the five top slot canyoneering sites of Buckskin Gulch, Spooky and Peekaboo, Zion Narrows, Little White Horse, and Kanarra Creek/Falls; Bryce Canyon National Park, Monument Valley, Chaco Canyon, Mesa Verde National Park and other ancient sites where there are opportunities to mix with Native American hosts in their own habitat including the Hopi people, Navaho Nation, Tiwa Puebloans, Ute people, and Jicarilla Apache Nation; comparative studies of great narratives; development of the American Great Narrative: interdisciplinary academic study for critical thinking with focus on Wittgenstein, Nietzsche, Lacan, Pascal, Rousseau, Kierkegaard, Jung, Derrida, Sartre, Montaigne, and  Jordan Peterson; study of First Principles; creative collaboration; psychological maturation development; physical, mental, and psychological conditioning, including obstacle course, Hatha yoga and martial arts; workforce training simulator practice; entrepreneurial training development; and community volunteer work.

4. North Coast of Kaua’i Field Center: Practicum Training and Interdisciplinary Academic Study–Three Months (for details and images: https://wp.me/P9fWT5-wD)

The great benefit of North Coast of Kaua’i to our young veterans is that their experience will become one of the most profound encounters with the natural world.  The island of Kauai is 4 million years old; the oldest of the 1,500-mile chain of Hawaiian islands that has evolved from volcanic activity.  Kaua’i was initially inhabited roughly 1,500 years ago by the same Polynesian venturers who completed their nearly 2,000-mile sea voyage on outrigger canoes when they first landed on the shores of the big island of Hawaii. Here they stayed undisturbed for around 500 years, until a second wave of sea-canoe travelers appeared, this time from Tahiti (which was also originally settled by Polynesian sea-canoe explorers). It was from the Tahitian arrival that the current Hawaiian gods, belief structures and many traditions evolved.  Kaua‘i is the most northern island in the Hawaiian Islands, lying 120 miles from Honolulu, O’ahu.  Kaua‘i is known for the variety of microclimates that exist throughout the Island including temperate regions, dry sand dune complexes, and lush river valleys. The complex climate on Kaua‘i is created in part by the Island’s high mountains, such as the centrally-located Mt. Wai’ale’ale (5,148 feet), which traps moisture from the prevailing trade winds, creating vast amounts of rainfall (a yearly average of 449 inches of rain—the world’s second wettest location) and surface runoff that have carved deep canyons into the Island.  The Napali Coast State Park, along the northwest coast of Kaua‘i, contains some of the most isolated coastal lands in the state. The park extends along more than 15 miles of coast that consists of steeply dipping knife-edge ridges and deep erosional V-shaped valleys. The ridges descend as narrow fingers directly to the ocean where they have been truncated into a

spectacular sea cliff coastline. The extremely steep-sided valley walls of the Napali Coast are covered with extensive vegetation supported by surface water draining seaward off of Mt. Wai‘ale‘ale. Fresh water cascades—in many places hundreds of meters—as waterfalls that create a lush seascape of vibrant green mountainsides that drop into the sea. Entry and exploration of this extraordinary terrain is achieved on foot, on horseback, in  sea kayaks, in 38-foot, Zodiac-style rubber boats along the sea caves of the Napali Coast, and by helicopter. One of the first encounters will be negotiating the world-famous and legendary Kalalau Trail, a 22-mile round trip hike high atop the Napali cliffs overlooking the Pacific Ocean below.  An important encounter will occur with indigenous Kaua’ian elders who will explain their origins and Great Narrative.  Other encounters will be to strengthen swimming skills and engage in training in snorkeling, scuba diving, surfing, wind-surfing, waterfall climbing and rappelling; study of First Principles; creative collaboration; psychological maturation development; physical, mental, and psychological conditioning, including obstacle course, Hatha yoga and martial arts; workforce training simulator practice; entrepreneurial training development; and community volunteer work.

5. Achuar Territory, Ecuador Rainforest Field Center: Practicum Training and Interdisciplinary Academic Study–Three Months (for details and images: https://wp.me/P9fWT5-1s and please use this link to clearly see the images below)

4,000 years ago, the Jivaroan people came together in the Ecuadorian rainforest of the Amazon region of South America.  Their environment was blessed with a vast abundance of food, water, and plant medicines, as well as a favorable climate.  The Jivaroan people have been one of the last of the indigenous people on the earth to hold off Western influence. The Achuar are one of the five major groups that make up the Jivaroan population who live among the headwaters of the Maramon River (marked in pink on the left side of the map below), which runs north, then turns northwest to join the Amazon River.  The subgroups include: the Kichwa, Sapara, Shiwlar, Achaur, and the Shaur.

The Jivaroan people are marked by a very distinct culture that adapted to prevent their own extinction. First, they learned to fight off the encroaching and dominant Inca Empire (1438-1533), and second, they were then forced to fight off the even more formidable Spanish Conquistadors, beginning in 1526 and terminating with the Spanish-American War of 1898. The numerically inferior Jivaroan people adapted by spreading out and disappearing far into the Amazon Rainforest.  An additional tactic was to create a profound awe among their enemies through extraordinary fierceness in battle which included an alarming headhunting tradition; a tactic of decapitating their enemies and shrinking their heads. The Achuar subgroup live along the Pastaza River (purple arrow on the map) that runs on both sides of the border between Ecuador and Peru. The heavily-resisted and stalled-out Manta-Manaus Commercial Corridor Project is marked in red.

The Archuar, like the other subsets of the Jivaroan people, learned, over centuries, how to hold off powerful invaders—particularly the Incas and the Conquistadors—but with the discovery of oil throughout Jivaroan land in 1964, a new and far more powerful enemy has made its appearance; the deadly transnational petroleum corporations.

From Wikipedia:

“Due to the development of the Amazon Rainforest, the Achuar people’s numbers and livelihood have been declining. When oil was discovered in the Amazon in 1964, oil companies began to make claims on land for development and profit. Such claims, their development, and a history of violent attacks on oil investment installations throughout the Amazon have resulted in the Achuar being excluded from a portion of operational & drilling areas in the territory traditionally claimed by the Achuar. Non-Indigenous contact has also seen introduction of new diseases (including new STDs) and conflict related to pollution from oil spills, improper business practices, and violent interactions.  In multiple but not all cases, oil spills of various degrees have been inadequately remediated by simple burial. Major oil pipelines run above rivers that the Achuar depend on for bathing and drinking. When these oil pipelines break, pollution can and has occurred, thereby degrading the resource and limiting Achuar access to their historic fresh (but untreated) water sources. Violent conflicts with non-Indigenous people have arisen between oil company employees and the native Achuar.”

Earlier in this presentation it was noted that one of the best way to learn about how the world actually works is to enter the fray of real world disaster relief operations and this brings us to the core reason why the Course includes the Achuar Territory in the Ecuadorian Rainforest:  The Achuar people are in the midst of a deadly struggle that includes the contamination and theft of their land and water resources. The remaining 18,500 Achuar are facing the reality—-so often the tragedy of indigenous peoples across the world—-of their own impending extinction. In 1995, based on a Achuar dream ceremony, their leadership found and invited a well-connected American group, the Pachamama Alliance, to visit and give consideration to lending advice and assistance (for details, please click on: https://www.pachamama.org/about/origin).  The Course will include an extended encounter with the Achuar people in their habitat to be arranged by the Pachamama Alliance. Mixing with the leadership of the Pachamama Alliance and the Achuar people, the Class members will gain an understanding of the current situation, discuss alternatives, and provide community volunteer work.  In return, the Class members will be introduced to the Achuar Great Narrative, their dream visions, their hunting techniques (with blowguns, spears, and bows and arrows); gathering activities, and plant medicine techniques. There will also be an opportunity to study the nature of the Achuar educational system and how it contributes to their social intelligence and social consciousness.  Additional learning elements will include study of First Principles; creative collaboration; psychological maturation development; physical, mental, and psychological conditioning, including an obstacle course, Hatha yoga and martial arts; workforce training simulator practice; entrepreneurial training development; and community volunteer work.

6. U.S. East Coast Corridor Field Immersion: Practicum Training and Interdisciplinary Academic Study–Three Months  (for details and images: https://wp.me/P9fWT5-CG and please use this link to clearly see the following maps)

The Quito/Toronto flight facilitates an encounter with the Six Nations Iroquois Reserve located 50 miles west of Niagara Falls, New York.

The purpose of exploring the East Coast Corridor is to re-energize the Class members understanding and full appreciation of the origins of the United States of America; the original Great American Narrative; our founding documents; the original American first principles, and the struggles to complete and sustain the American Revolution.  The route to be taken will start at Concord Bridge, Lexington, then move to Boston, then down the East Coast Corridor to New York City, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington, DC; then a 105-mile foot and horse trek on the Appalachian Trail through the Shenandoah National Park; east and down to Yorktown, Virginia; and ending at the Misty Mountain Camp Resort in Greenwood, Virginia, near Charlottesville. Exploration will include the Gettysburg Battleground and, in particular, the Yorktown, Virginia Battleground where, after 25 major battles, stretching from April 19, 1775 to October 19, 1781, General George Washington’s forces finally drove the British Army from American shores in military defeat.  Other learning elements will be additional free-fall parachute training at Jumptown in Orange, Massachusetts; climbing and rappelling in the Shenandoah National Forest; creative collaboration; psychological maturation development; additional physical, mental, and psychological conditioning, including Hatha yoga and martial arts; workforce training simulations; and working with Ariel Group in Lexington, Massachusetts in developing core leadership skills through pulling up one’s authentic self; entrepreneurial training development; training in the construction and sale of workforce training simulators and boarding house communities; and community volunteer work along the way.

Certain Core Healing Dynamics Of the Course

1.  The Veterans of the First Class Will Be Responsible For the Work of Building and Developing The Course From the Ground Up:  This is a high incentive for our Next Generation veterans to be in on the First Class because they will help shape the entire Pilot Project based on their experience and insights on behalf of all at-risk American veterans who may follow in their footsteps.  In other words, the Pilot Project is going to be a mobile laboratory for a set of trial and error experimentations with healing methodologies in which the 48 veterans of the First Class will become a “thought community” engaged in a highly creative collaboration along with their 12 mentors to discuss, dissect, and recommend adjustments to maximize the healing potential of the Course.

2.  Resurrecting A Powerful and Lasting Sense of Brotherhood:  A cornerstone of the Pilot Project is to find ways to resurrect an authentic sense of brotherhood among the young at-risk veterans of each Class.  A common thread in discussions with many veterans is the abrupt and substantial loss of a sense of commitment, sacrifice,  camaraderie, and personal loyalty, particularly among combat veterans, when they return to civilian life.  Furthermore, this loss is magnified for returning veterans, if they are subjected to certain corporate workforce cultures marked by corruption of top leadership, systemic irresponsibility in the ranks, endless game-playing and egocentric behavior; all of which are intolerable to highly experienced and disciplined veterans.       

A further effort to build a sense of brotherhood is arranging for our veterans to live in Next Generation Boarding House Communities—in quality affordable housing for men— instead of living alone or with their parents (for details, see https://wp.me/P9fWT5-dV)

3.  Helping Build and Reinforce Our At-Risk Next Generation Veterans’ Inner Compass, Personal Identities and Sense of Self-Worth:  Many of our at-risk young veterans are in desperate need of older, wiser, and highly experienced mentors who can help pull up, build on, and reinforce their inner compass, personal identities, and sense of self-worth. Meanwhile, American education, with its straight-jacket curriculum of a myriad of academic courses of increasingly questionable quality and relevance, fed to our youth three times a week in 45-minute, pre-packaged increments, is finally becoming recognized as the dumbing-down of our Next Generations. Accordingly, our Bellows Mentors will not be sought from the academic ranks of American education.  Instead, they will be chosen for their ability to go back to basics; to the way indigenous peoples educated their next generations, who selected their best qualified elders who understood their role was to lay the groundwork for strong succeeding generations that would protect, sustain, and reinvigorate their societies.  Especially in terms of building and reinforcing each next generation’s inner compass, personal identities and sense of self-worth, it will require a great narrative to be the cornerstone to this crucial task, which is largely missing in American education.  The highly-respected educator, Neil Postman, who wrote The End of Education (1994), noted that the best and healthiest societies tended to be grounded on great narratives, which:

“…….tell of origins and envision a future, a story that constructs ideals, prescribes rules of conduct, provides a source of authority, and, above all, gives a sense of continuity and purpose…..one that has sufficient credibility, complexity, and symbolic power to enable one to organize one’s life around it…one that provides people with a sense of personal identity, a sense of a community life…..Our genius lies in our capacity to make meaning through the creation of narratives that give point to our labors, exalt our history, elucidate the present, and give direction to our future.”

Accordingly, the 18-month Course must select its mentors well and train them to follow the norms of the best indigenous elder-mentors, who, for example, also understood and conveyed the Seven Generations Principle, namely, an ancient Iroquois philosophy that the decisions we make today should result in a sustainable world seven generations into the future.

Furthermore, it should be noted that the Great Law of the Iroquois Confederacy is also credited as being a contributing influence on the American Constitution, due to Benjamin Franklin’s great respect for the Iroquois system of government, which in itself is interesting from the perspective that the United States formed their Constitution not on the principles of European governments, but rather on that of a people considered “savages”. (for details, see http://www.upenn.edu/gazette/0107/gaz09.html)

When the Class completes the Achuar Territory segment of the Course, it will fly out of Quito, Ecuador and land in Toronto where it will intercept its Green Turtle-style buses to

reach the Iroquois Six Nations of the Grand River Reserve in Ohsweken, Ontario, Canada, 50 miles west of Niagara Falls, New York. Six Nations is the largest indigenous reserve in Canada by populations and the second largest reserve by size. Located between Hamilton, Brantford and Simcoe, Ontario, Six Nations is the only reserve in North America where all six Iroquois nations live together. These nations include the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca and Tuscarora. As of the end of 2017, Six Nations has a total of 27,276 members, 12,848 of whom live on the reserve.

4.  Psychological Maturation

A fourth element of the healing dynamics of the Course is to bring about the psychological maturation of our Next Generation veterans, especially our most at-risk young veterans.  There is a well-grounded public concern that America’s Next Generation (18-34) is showing signs of disempowerment and disorientation based on six key factors as described below. My research suggests that America’s Next Generation is facing economic, social and psychological stress that is not well understood by the American public or the American government and that many of this age group are actually in a state of disintegration. For details, see: https://wp.me/P9fWT5-10

(1)  36+% of our Next Generation have been forced to return to live with their parents, unable to make ends meet;

(2)  Far too many of our Next Generation have been under-employed or unemployed for too long and parents explain and lament the deterioration of spirit, work ethic, of focus, and of physical health, and even of mental health;

(3)  Next Generation encounters with certain corporate work environments too often present unenlightened, corrosive, and demoralizing conditions;

(4)  Profound mental and physical fatigue, as well as inertia, have already set in;

(5)  Moreover, another deadly sign of disintegration has surfaced—the opioid surge;

(6)  And even more ominous in terms of the long run, reproduction rates among members of the Next Generation are falling (see https://www.urban.org/research/publication/millennial-childbearing-and-recession)

What Is the Massive, Hidden Iceberg That Must Immediately Be Addressed?

The mission of the Pilot Project of a new National Service is not just to re-energize and transform current Next Generation members to regain their footing to fully engage in their life-pursuits, but even more important, the mission must acknowledge and address a crucial axiom: that all of American society must receive constant fresh infusions of new energy, enriching creativity, elemental drive, and a steady rate of procreation (not a decline in Next Generation birth rates, as is the current case) delivered by our next generations in order to insure America’s natural evolutionary advance.  Without that steady infusion from their next generations, societies begin to stall out, deteriorate, fracture, and head for collapse.  This is the very dilemma faced by the mature societies of Japan and European nation-states.

Unfortunately, America’s evolutionary advance is already being substantially weakened by the disintegration of many among our Next Generation as described in #1 through #6 of the previous page. In fact, the actual condition of America’s Next Generation is another “canary in the coal mine” indicator that the flow of fresh Next Generation infusions is threatened.  And that while collision with the hidden iceberg is imminent, there is no one on the bridge of our ship who is aware of the existential danger ahead.

Recap: The National Service Pilot Project constitutes a powerful intervention on three levels:

1. It has the potential to mitigate the economic, social and psychological disintegration suffered by many members of our Next Generation and help them regain momentum to advance in their life-pursuits, and especially this is the case for our most at-risk young veterans.

2. It can reestablish the vital role of our entire Next Generation—and the next generations that follow—to add their new energy, fresh creativity, elemental drive, and steady rate of procreation to sustain America’s natural evolutionary advance as a sovereign nation-state of exceptional productivity and solidarity.

3. It can become the proving grounds, by trial and error, for a pragmatic and time-tested plan to rebuild our failed model of American education, where misguidance runs amok; where costs spike; where relevance continues to fade; and where the continued dumbing down of our next generations will guarantee that America’s natural evolutionary advance will be reversed and the specter of a neo-feudal state will surely emerge, unchecked.

Informative Images and Text of the Field Immersion Locations

 

The Four Corners location of the American Southwest is where four states converge:  Utah, top, left; Colorado, top, right; Arizona, lower, left; and New Mexico, lower, right.  The terrain surrounding the Four Corners region is thinly populated, arid, and rugged.

Using aerial map, below, Boulder, Utah is marked in the top left with a red pin.  The Four Corners where Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and Colorado join is marked by the white dotted lines that cross near the towns of Red Mesa and Teec Nos Pos.  The Canyonlands National Park, which contains the spectacular rock art, is located in the top left quadrant of the aerial.  The bottom two quadrants contain the locations of the Navaho, Hopi, Apache, Ute and Zuni nations.

 

 

The Horse Trek Along The Legendary Outlaw Trail and Into Canyonlands National Park’s Horseshoe Canyon

 

 

For more details on Utah rock art:  http://utahoutdoorfun.com/horseshoe-canyon-utahs-most-famous-art-gallery/   

Below, is the world-famous Great Gallery in Horseshoe Canyon in Canyonland National Park

Above, Native American Don Montoya, MA, RPA, is the lead archaeologist for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management covering 1.8 million acres in southeastern Utah surrounding the La Sal Mountains, Arches National Park, and portions of Canyonlands National Park.  He also conducts consultation with Native American Tribes who have ancestral claim to the use of resources in the region.  He has been held this position since January 2011.

From July 2005 to January 2011, Don was the Curator and head of the Anasazi State Park Museum in Boulder, Utah, which covers the well-known Coombs Village, a massive archaeological site.  It is a well-preserved site with a brief but interesting history, settled by Virgin Branch people around 1160 CE and abandoned along with the rest of the nearby area around 1230 CE. There are signs that it was used as a seasonal village site from a much earlier date, but during that time, it was a permanently occupied town with an important role to play in the politics of the region.

Don is of Taos origins. Prior to his work in Utah, he spent over 20 years in the high tech industry, primarily with Digital Equipment Corporation and holds a masters degree in anthropology.

Coombs Village

In the 1950’s, there were only three well-known archaeological cultures in the Southwest: the Puebloans, or Anasazi, who occupied the Four Corners region, the Mogollon of northern Mexico and New Mexico, and the Hohokam of Southern Arizona (and even the cultural distinctiveness of Mogollon was still disputed by some). This meant that any large sites found above a certain meridian were simply assumed to be Puebloan, including this one, which was assigned to a large subset of Anasazi called the Kayenta Branch.

Coombs Village is indisputably a Puebloan site, but the Puebloans were not, as it turns out, the only vibrant and influential culture in ancient Utah. Starting as early as the 1930’s, some researchers had started to notice some distinctive patterns of rock art and basketry that were unique to central Utah, which they named the Fremont Culture.  as the decades marched on, the portrait of the Fremont has become clearer and more compelling. Many large sites have been identified and still pop up periodically as more and more of Utah is disturbed by construction projects, and along the way any doubt as to the existence of Fremont Culture has dissipated. This has had some interesting implications for the Coombs site, which as it turns out was right on the frontier between the Fremont and Puebloan culture areas. Like many Southern Utah sites, it contains artifacts from both cultures, and even structural evidence of cultural mixing.

For more details:  https://homonculusblog.wordpress.com/tag/coombs-site/

The Perspectives of the Indigenous People of the American Southwest and Across the Rest of America

 

 

The Third Prospective Field Center: Puyo in the Achuar Territory of the Ecuadorian Rainforest

Below, The Five Indigenous Peoples In Ecuador Are Clustered In The Rainforest To The Southeast, Near The Border With Peru

We Have A Great Deal To Learn From The Achuar

The 4,000 year-old history of the Achuar is marked by a very distinct culture that adapted to prevent its own extinction:  first, the Achuar, a subset of the Jivaro people, learned to fight off the encroaching and dominant Inca Empire (1438-1533), and second, the Achuar learned to fight off the even more formidable Spanish Conquistadors beginning in 1526 and terminating with the Spanish-American War of 1898.  The numerically inferior Jivaro people adapted by spreading out and disappearing far into the Amazon Rainforest, having very little contact with the Conquistadors.  And another tactic was to create a sense of terrible fierceness and profound awe in war with their unique practice of decapitating their enemies and shrinking their heads.

The process of creating a shrunken head begins with removing the skull from the head. An incision is made on the back of the neck and all the skin and flesh is removed from the cranium. Red seeds are placed underneath the eyelids and the lips are sewn shut. The mouth is held together with three palm pins. Fat from the flesh of the head is removed. Then a wooden ball is placed under the flesh in order to keep the form. The flesh is then boiled in water that has been saturated with a number of herbs containing tannins. The head is then dried with hot rocks and sand, while molding it to retain its human features. The skin is then rubbed down with charcoal ash. Decorative beads may be added to the head.[3]

In the head shrinking tradition, it is believed that coating the skin in ash keeps the muisak, or avenging soul, from seeping out.

Shrunken heads are known for their mandibular prognathism, facial distortion and shrinkage of the lateral sides of the forehead; these are artifacts of the shrinking process.

Among the Shuar and Achuar, the reduction of the heads was followed by a series of feasts centered on important rituals.

 

The practice of preparing shrunken heads originally had religious significance; shrinking the head of an enemy was believed to harness the spirit of that enemy and compel him to serve the shrinker. It was said to prevent the soul from avenging his death. (From Wikipedia)

 

The Fourth Prospective Field Center:  The Mountain Desert  Borderland Environs of Patagonia, Arizona

Patagonia is 18 miles north of the U.S./Mexico border and one hour’s drive south of the Tucson International Airport. The surrounding Coronado National Forest provides Patagonia with a sense of seclusion and, yet proximity to a major airport.

Patagonia (population 900), at an elevation of 4,050 feet, lies in a narrow valley between the Santa Rita Mountains, which peak at 9,453 feet and and the Patagonia Mountains, which peak at 7,221 feet, at the intersection of Harshaw Creek and Sonoita Creek. Accordingly, the riparian habitat created by the confluence of these creeks provided ideal conditions for clusters of ancient settlements with ruins and petroglyphs of the Anasazi leaving their mark.  The Santa Rita Mountains have the Smithsonian-sponsored Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory at Mt. Hopkins available for astronomy.

The first presence of the Spaniards occurred in 1539 and a century and a half later, the Jesuit priest Padre Eusebio Francisco Kino traveled through the region, establishing one of his visitas—–overnight houses located between the larger missions—–in nearby Sonoita. In 1853, the Gadsden Purchase made the corner of southeastern Arizona, then part of Mexico, a part of the United States, leading to the break-up of vast Spanish land grants by homesteaders, ranchers and miners. Cattle ranching, mining and the railroads have come and gone, leaving Patagonia as a hybrid borderland culture with a population that is over half of Hispanic origin, consisting of shopkeepers, artists, craftspersons, former cowboys, vaqueros, miners and retirees.

The Nature Conservancy’s Patagonia-Sonoita Creek Preserve, a world-famous riparian habitat. Home to 300 bird species and a rare Fremont cottonwood-Goodding willow riparian forest and rare plant life. The riparian habitat continues on to Patagonia Lake.

Below, the nearby San Rafael Valley, rolling savanna of grass, oak and mesquite that was among the places where grassland plants and animals survived during the ice ages—-an ecosystem of great diversity and the location of several cattle ranches.

 

 

A Thought Community of mentors and students working on the scope of subject matter for the Field Centers at the Spirit Tree Inn outside Patagonia.

 

The Fifth Prospective Field Center:  The Surreal North Coast of the Island of Kauai; A Deep Immersion in Nature

 

 

The Second Wettest Spot on Earth, Mount Wai‘ale‘ale on Kaua‘i  

Resting sleepily in the scenic background behind Kukui’ula, is the majestic Mt. Wai’ale’ale. Located almost exactly in the middle of the island, this towering green mountain range is usually tucked behind a shroud of wispy rain clouds. Wai’ale’ale means “rippling water” or “overflowing water” in Hawaiian and is the second wettest spot on earth, receiving about 450 inches of rain each year. The rainiest year on record is 1982 with 683 inches.

mount waialeale

“Many sources say that Mt. Wai’ale’ale is the wettest spot on Earth, however, the 38-year average at Mawsynram (India) is higher at 467.4 inches (11,870 mm), according to the Guinness Book of World Records. Located in the center of Kauai, Mt. Waialeale rises 5,148 feet (1,569 m), making it the second highest peak on the island, after Kawaikini at 5,243 feet (1,598 m).” – Wikipedia

How does it stay so wet when the rest of the island is so sunny? Kauai is the northernmost of the main Hawaiian Islands, allowing for much more exposure to front winds and rain in the winter. The summit itself is round in shape, which exposes all sides of its summit to dampening winds. It is also located just below the “trade wind inversion layer” in an area where trade-wind-generated clouds cannot rise. However the mountain’s steep cliffs cause the humid air to rise quickly, allowing for a large portion of rain in one spot.

Best way to see Mt Wai’ale’ale? Hike the surrounding Alakai Wilderness Preserve (also known as Alakai Swamp) or enjoy a helicopter tour overlooking the “Weeping Wall”. Waialeale.org supplies more information including maps, guidebooks and environmental news. Alakai Swamp is known for its wide range of protected animal and plant species. Lush ferns, trees and plants make up this beautiful trail. The “Weeping Wall” consists of the numerous, thin waterfalls running down towards the base of the mountain, a surreal sight to behold.

The summit itself is relatively barren, despite all the water it receives. One reason? In addition to the lack of sunshine, few plants and trees can handle that much rain! For more information regarding hiking Mt. Wai’ale’ale contact Huaka’i Outfitters.

 

 

 

 

Below, Waterfall Rappelling

 

Above and below, Scuba Training

Above and below, Horse Treks on the North Coast of Kauai

 

Below, Dismounting and Cooling Off

 

 

 

 

 

The World-Acclaimed Kalalau Trail On The North Coast Of The Island Of Kauai

 

TRAVEL
05/06/2016 06:00 am ET

The Kalalau Trail Is Hands Down The Most Incredible Hike In America

An epic adventure awaits.

The Kalalau Trail on the Hawaiian island of Kauai weaves through one of the world’s most famous natural wonders, the Na Pali coast. With 180-degrees of the electric blue Pacific, majestic ridges and unspoiled beaches, every inch of this tropical trail boasts epic views.

Let’s trek in, shall we?

The Kalalau Trail is a 22-mile roundtrip hike that zigzags through five lush valleys, unpredictable streams and along tiny footpaths that scale steep sea cliffs.

It’s by no means a beginner’s endeavor, but with the right training and preparation, the end reward — completely isolated beaches, dramatic mountains and seaside caves — is definitely worth the arduous trek.

The first two miles of the trail, which starts at Ha’ena State Park, is perfect for a day hike that ends at Hanakapi’ai Beach. From there, you can even choose to hike two extra miles into the valley for a cool dip next to the 300-foot Hanakapi’ai waterfall.

After that first leg of the trail, however, the hike gets distinctively more dangerous — and remote.

The Na Pali Coast on the island of Kauai is paradise untamed.

The Na Pali Coast on the island of Kauai is paradise untamed.

The first leg of the trail leads to Hanakapi'ai Beach near a gorgeous falls. You'll want to end the hike here, but

The first leg of the trail leads to Hanakapi’ai Beach near a gorgeous falls. You’ll want to end the hike here, but keep going.

After Hanakapi’ai Beach, hikers have to trek down exhausting switchbacks into the valley and scale along sketchy ridges, such as the infamous Crawler’s ledge, all while carrying their heavy gear.

While it’s possible to hike the full 11 miles that lead to the Kalalau Valley in a single day, most hikers opt to take their time, pitching their tents at the halfway point in the Hanakoa Valley near a stream that leads to its own waterfall.

Those planning to hike further than Hanakapi’ai Beach will have to purchase an overnight permit from the state’s Department of Land and Natural Resources. Book this as early as you can, as there is a limited number of camping permits and they can sell out months in advance.

The trail’s end in the Kalalau Valley offers a second campsite, which is where a whole new adventure awaits.

The Kalalau Valley campsite is set just behind the beach — a beach that is only accessible to those who have hiked 11 miles. Needless to say, it’s a magical place, and from there, hikers can explore the valley with a two-mile hiking trail that leads to streams and tiny waterfalls.

Since you’re truly alone here — there isn’t a single road leading to the valley — the Hawaii state Department of Land and Natural Resources recommends packing a lightweight sleeping bag, tent with rainfly, cooking stove with fuel and a water filter or purification tablets. You can find a full list of required gear here.

Just remember that in order to leave the Na Pali coast as beautiful as you found it, you have to pack light enough so that you can carry your gear — and any trash you produce along the way — in and out of the Kalalau Trail.

The best time to attempt the trail is during the summer when the weather is relatively dry and the ocean is calm. But spontaneous rain, which Kauai is known for, can cause sudden flash flooding, turning a trickling stream into a raging river within minutes.

In the past, unsuspecting hikers have been swept away and stranded by flooded streams. High quality hiking shoes with good grip, trekking poles, adequate water and, most of all, experience, are essential.

“Experience is important so that you can confidently handle any slippery terrain and feel comfortable hiking next to steep drop-offs on the side of the trail,” David Chatsuthiphan of the hiking blog Unreal Hawaii told The Huffington Post.

The journey may be difficult and, at times, completely frightening, but we promise you, your heart will feel like it’s crying gorgeous rainbows the entire way.

Below, find all the inspiration you’ll need to book a flight and head out for the most memorable hike of your life.

Above, Hanakapi’ai Falls, a short distance from Hanakapi’ai Beach along the Kalalau Trail

 

Above, “Crawler’s Ledge at the 7-mile mark of the Kalalau Trail.

  

 

Commentary

Probably due to the long trek ahead, when Carla reached Hanakapi’ai Beach, she continued on Trail.  However, there is an opportunity you should know about.  If Carla had taken the time to follow the stream that empties into the sea at that beach, she would have discovered one of the most breathtaking water holes, just a half a mile inland.  It is the Hanakapi’ai Falls.  If you are thinking that you might want to visit Kauai and hike the Kalalau Trail, it would be worth your time to see the following video clip that shows this one-of-a-kind setting.

To find this video clip, first pull up: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lsrcF_PiMHM.  When the clip comes up, click on the name, Sarah Rotavera, and when her clips are displayed, click on the one titled:  “Hiking Kalalau Trail—Kauai Travel Vlog.”

It should be noted that at Mile Seven of the Kalalau Trail, there is a stretch that has acquired the telling label, to wit, “Crawlers Ledge.”

In bad weather, marked by wind, rain, and slippery mud, the Crawler’s Ledge is daunting, indeed.  On a separate page of your browser pull up YouTube and type in “crawler’s ledge kalalau.”  You will see a young woman wearing a red backpack, leading the way, seemingly un-intimidated.  It’s a video clip of 7:53 minutes along Crawler’s Ledge, no musical accompaniment, and a faint heartbeat in the background, making you wonder if it is your own heart as you take in the increasingly serious drama of their undertaking as they press on.

 

 

A Glimpse Into The Indigenous Hawaiian Culture 

 

 

 

 

 

6.  Entering The Fray As the Ultimate Learning Environment

We have spoken at length, herein, about the means by which we intend to help prepare and re-energize our next generation for their life-pursuits.

Now, we turn to the final building block of learning environments; what we refer to as “Entering the Fray.”  That means showing up and personally engaging in complex, real world situations, where outside volunteer help is urgently needed.

On of our plunges into the fray involved a 1,343-mile trek in the Bellows van from Tucson to Baton Rouge, LA and back to lend assistance during the Hurricane Katrina disaster.

 

 

The First Baptist Church Provided Room and Board Upon Arrival In Baton Rouge and Church Member Chuck Budd (right) Was My Navigator

 

A Walk-Through of  the Red Cross Shelters in Baton Rouge Offering Transportation To  Houston and West

 

Arriving From Baton Rouge  With the Delgrado Family To Connect With Their Friends Who Resided in Houston                                                                               

 

A Walk-Through the Red Cross Shelter in the Houston Astrodome

Below, a Photo the Red Cross Shelter at the Houston Astrodome Near Peak Capacity During Hurricane Katrina.   It Was Reported That At Peak Capacity During the Katrina Crisis, a Total of 29,000 Evacuees Were Sheltered In All Four Houston Red Cross Shelters

 

A Walk-Through of the Red Cross Shclter in San Antonio Filled With Evacuees From Katrina

Entering the Geopolitical Fray and Discovering a Potential Bellows Field Center

Our visit to the Achuar people was, essentially, a reconnaissance mission.  We showed up and we engaged with them and tried to determine how we could join their fight to defeat the geopolitical dynamics that have entrapped not just the Achuar people, but the entire global population.  And the Pachamama Alliance, a private enterprise, is what it takes to get organized and savvy about strategies and tactics to win.  It is an already-successful model for entering the fray and making a real difference.

BellowMentors must learn from Pachamama Alliance and adopt its ethos and methodologies as part of our own.  Accordingly, placing a BellowsMentor Field Center in Achuar territory (if invited) would enable us to enter the fray by establishing one of the most dynamic learning environments possible for our Next Generation charges and participating in the eradication of this global pestilence.

For details, please contact:  www.pachamama.org

7.  Next Generation Mental, Physical, and Coordination Conditioning and Re-Energizing

The Conditioning Mentors will have the responsibility to:

  • Pull their students out of their comfort zones and build their mental and physical strength to peak performance.
  • Teach their students how to maintain that level of mental and physical strength throughout their lives.
  • Teach their students coordination by having them learn different forms of dance and of martial arts.
  • Teach their students how to select, apportion, prepare, cook their own meals by serving shifts in the student kitchens to learn food intake discipline.
  • Teach their students to embrace a high level of  situational awareness—un-intiminated by the realities of life—guided by flexible planning, strength of character, sound judgment, and deeply-rooted equanimity, rather than succumbing to uncertainty, anxiety and depression.
  • For the physical and mental safety of the students, there will be monitoring of key vital signs to measure physical and mental condition.   Use of narcotics, alcohol, and other mind-altering substances will result in automatic transfer to a central detox and psychiatric center and re-enrollment in a later cohort upon successful completion of an individually proscribed treatment.

 

The Morning Run

 

A Part Of The “O” Course

 

 

The First Level Of Creative Collaboration

 

The Basics of Operating As A Team

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Building Physical Endurance And Mental Perseverance

 

 

More On Balance and Coordination With A Wet Penalty Attached

 

 

A Conditioning Mentor Is Waiting To Get You On The Legendary Outlaw Trail

 

 

 

 

You’re Going To Learn Hatha Yoga That Will Follow You For The Rest Of Your Life

 

 

Then Comes Extending Your Mobility

 

 

Learning About Situational Awareness

 

 

 

Getting Down Is Always Easier, Now It Time To Learn Climbing Up

 

The Up Part Requires Summoning Up Mental Fortitude and Strength of Character

 

He Had A Fall, But No Worries—-He Was Tied In

Learning To Enter New Worlds

 

Down To the Briny Deep

Windsurfing: Talk About Coordination!

 

Now More Mental Conditioning

Part of mental conditioning includes mastering fear, uncertainty, and doubt to learn to be unintimidated while working outside your comfort zone.  Steve started early with his middle school students by taking them to the Skydive Arizona Free-Fall Parachuting Center in Eloy, Arizona to practice free-fall in a free-fall simulator, which acts as a vertical wind tunnel to shoot a column of air upward in a circular clear plastic chamber at the rate of 120 miles per hour—-just the speed that you would experience if you were making a real free-fall jump from an aircraft.  Below, you see Maricela showing all the nervous boys how its done.  Steve took all his students including the seniors, and when two of them turned eighteen years of age, they invited Steve to jump with them when they made their first actual parachute jump—tandem-style—by being securely attached to their instructor.

Now For The Real Parachuting

Your First Jump Is Tandem: You’re Securely Attached To Your Instructor On Your Initial Several Jumps and You Even Get Your Picture Taken In Free-Fall

From Then On You Have Two Instructors Who Fall Alongside And Hold On To You Until They Say:

“You’re Ready For Free-Fall On Your Own”

Graduation To Free-Fall On Your Own And You Receive A Diploma

Now Country Western Dance

In Settings Like the Buffalo Chip Saloon in Cave Creek, AZ

Why? To Develop Coordination and Learning How To Really Dance With A Partner

 

Then On To Martial Arts.

Why?  To Know How To Fight Quick and Hard In Self-Defense and Get Them On the Run

 

Beginning To Re-Energize and Transform

 

8. Into Another Enlightening and Dynamic New Learning Environment:  Workplace Training Simulators

First,  a full-scale Workplace Training Simulator To Accommodate Student Teams of Six Using Complex Scenarios and “Theater-Play” That Replicates Actual Operations Of All Kinds

The full-scale Workplace Training Simulator is designed as a prototypical workspace consisting of three integrated sub-spaces: (i) the six-person work space, (ii) their conference space, and (iii) the supervisor’s office, where a faculty member can play the supervisor role in order to learn leadership and followership dynamics, and where leadership and team interaction is practiced by giving each student a chance to take on the supervisor’s role.

 

Second, The Mobile Workplace Simulator

Mobile Workplace Training Simulators—The use of large custom vehicles to get student teams of up to ten on the road and visit a series of profit or non-profit operations of any kind to develop a comprehensive comparative analysis of the economic niche being studied that is both a student learning experience in close collaboration with peers, but may also be of value to the respective operations which could provide another valuable level of collaborative exchange (between the student teams and each operational staff.  For example, the student team of ten can join in a combined workspace on the Internet with the operational staff and run a work scenario together in which a scripted role-play can be carried on to achieve a specific operational objective and an after-action critique can also be carried out.  Then to stimulate the vital camaraderie, they can all meet at a local watering hole for dinner to swap stories.

9.  Next Generation Boarding House Communities 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.  Next Generation Individual and Team Job Placement Service

An integral component of the Next Generation National Service (NGNS) is periodic visits to employers for the following purposes:

  • Ask key management members to explain what is missing from the education of its new employees.
  • Explain the value of setting up one or more on-site workplace training simulators to help the employer improve the proficiency of its workforce.
  • Volunteer to build the first workforce training simulator for the employer and getting it into operation.  A special team from NGNS will be sent to undertake this task.  Follow up with new scenarios and theater-play features that widen the effectiveness of the workplace training simulator.
  • Explain the value of engaging NGNS’s special field camps to re-energize certain members, teams, and departments of the employer’s workforce with input from the employer to customize the learning environments and methodologies.

Publish reports to all employers about NGNS’s accumulating improvements made to its learning environments and methodologies and their results.

Illuminate specific NGSG students and their qualifications for placement and escort each student to the interviews to insure a smooth transition to successful placement.

NGNS will endeavor to place its students in teams of two to six with each employer by: (1) helping the employer recognized such work niches; (2) determining the detailed needs of that niche; (3) volunteering to modify a NGNS workplace training simulator with scenarios and theater-play to further train the student team to meet the specific needs of that niche before sending the team to begin their employment employment.

11.  Next Generation National Service Pilot Project Working First With Tucson’s Next Generation in Pima County

The start-up phase will be to begin development of the NGNS Pilot Project with Pima County, Arizona’s Next Generation.  As this effort gathers momentum, several other U.S. counties will be selected to begin their NGNS Pilot Projects.  Accordingly, the NGNS National Service will spread at the county level across the U.S. and thus much of the management will emanate from the county level, with the administrative hub initially being located in Tucson, Arizona, within Pima County.

(This section is currently under construction.)

 

Epilogue

The conceptualization of the Next Generation National Service began to take shape around this heavy mesquite seminar table during the economics class for all the seniors of the Patagonia Union High School in the school year of 2008-2009.

There has been a great deal of productive experimentation.

The Principal of Patagonia Union High School, Peter Fagergren (Ed.D.) urged me to interlace my teaching of economics with mentoring stories whenever possible relating to my real world experiences in: (i) helping form the new sport of free-fall parachuting; (ii) the military culture of the Marine Corps as a reconnaissance platoon leader; (iii) working successively in two large for-profit corporations; (iv) co-founding and operating my own investment firm for over 25 years; (v) co-founding and operating a 501(c)3 educational foundation; (vi) the merits of completing two masters degrees; (vii) the requirements of being a father and grandfather; (viii) taking personal risk while learning to apply “margin of error” to remain intact (while engaged in parachuting, riding freight trains, and flying biplanes); (ix) reaching for a state of personal equanimity; and (x) navigating through a work-life, which seemed to be marked by increasing corruption, criminality, and  the  unfortunate disintegration of moral and ethical standards in many American institutions.

The seniors in the photo, above, enjoyed their classroom environment of student engagement and trust in one another.  Moreover, they enjoyed the out-of-doors experiences I invented to keep them alert, including the free-fall simulator at the SkyDive Arizona parachuting center.  Bellows, our educational foundation, continues to be dedicated to the success of America’s next generations to show up and enter the fray to add their high energy, their fresh creativity, their elemental drive, and spirituality to power America’s natural evolutionary advance.

By the way, the economics course was not dry and overly academic.  Instead, the entire 2008-2009 time span was filled with the most shocking and puzzling real world events leading to the world’s largest global economic collapse, which resulted in Ben Bernanke, the Chairman of the Federal Reserve reluctantly admitting in a Congressional Hearing on December 1st, 2010 that, since the global financial crash of 2008 and without informing the President or Congress, he secretly disbursed $16.3 trillion of tax-payer money and credit to American banks, foreign banks, foreign central banks, transnational corporations, and certain individuals at a time when the U.S. national debt was already $14 trillion.  What was that all about?  It caused a great deal of critical thinking and sparked the beginning of an awakening around that mesquite seminar table.

These circumstances were the catalyst of my decision near the end of 2010 to suspend my teaching responsibilities and spend full time on what turned out to be a seven+ year research and writing project to look into the subject of  “how does the world actually works as it pertains to our Next Generation.”  The  project culminated in writing two e-books.

The first book was completed in November 2013 and was titled:  A Grandfather’s Encouragement To Our Next Generation.  The second book was completed in November 2016 and was titled:  Restoring the Peace.  It went considerably further into the original research question.

It is now the middle of August of 2018, and we have a new research question, namely, now that we are in a fight to the finish, how are we going to win?  And what does winning look like?

Part of winning from my perspective is to:

1. Liberate our Next Generation from economic, social and psychological disintegration and facilitate their productive life-pursuits;

2. Re-establish the vital role of our Next Generation, and the next generations that follow, to add their new energy, fresh creativity, elemental drive, and full procreation function to be the catalyst for the natural evolutionary advance of American society as a sovereign nation-state of exceptional solidarity; 

3. Use the development and operation of New Generation National Service as a proving ground, by trial and error, for a plan to rebuild our failed model of American education, where costs spike and relevance continues to fade.  

The Spiritual Origins of the Next Generation National Service Come From This Quiet, Caring and Insightful Mentor:  Chester Henry Bellows

Chester Henry Bellows was Steve’s maternal grandfather. Born in New York City in 1890, his dedication to learning and mentorship profoundly affected his children, grandchildren, and many others who were inspired by his personal attention. He was the quintessential mentor.  His academic aspirations were thwarted by The Great Depression. Chet devoted much of his spare time to humanitarian and educational efforts, including the Boy Scouts and the Methodist Episcopal Church movements. Were he alive today, one would hear his mirthful chuckle to think that his influence might have an impact on American education in the 21st century.